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U.S. Trident Ballistic Missile streaks past a Mexican airliner’s cockpit during recent test

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Incredible video captures US Trident nuclear missile streaking across the night sky after test launch from a submarine as passenger jet pilots marvel as its beauty

  • A Mexican airbus flight crew shot video from their plane’s cockpit as a D5 Trident II Ballistic Missile flew across the horizon in front of them in September
  • The test took place during a time when competing world powers around the globe continue to flex their military muscle with recent displays of martial force 
  • Trident missiles are designed to be fired from surfaced submarines 
  • The USS Nebraska sub launched at least four missiles from September 4-6
  • The crew on an airbus traveling from Guadalajara to Tijuana, Mexico shot footage of a missile’s projectiles flying across the horizon during twilight  
  • Each D5 Trident missile costs $30.9 million to make
  • Only U.S. and UK submarines carry D5 Trident missiles, according to the Navy 

The passenger jet pilots who witnessed it streak across the night sky marveled at its beauty.

But they didn’t realize the incredible sight was a Trident missile – that can destroy entire countries with a nuclear warhead. 

The test firing of the ballistic missile by the USS Nebraska submarine was caught on video by the crew of a Mexican airliner flying to Tijuana.

The  Nebraska, stationed off the coast of southern California, launched at least four Trident II ballistic missiles between September 4-6.       

‘Wow,’ one of the Spanish-speaking flight crew members is heard saying repeatedly as the missile’s components fly by like a shooting star.

The clip shows the Trident missile streaking westward across the sky during sunset. 

Scroll down for video 

The crew of a Mexican airliner was recently granted a front-row seat to view one of the United States' latest missile tests in September

The crew of a Mexican airliner was recently granted a front-row seat to view one of the United States’ latest missile tests in September

The crew on an airbus traveling from Guadalajara to Tijuana, Mexico captured footage of one of the missile's illuminated projectiles flying across the twilit horizon

The crew on an airbus traveling from Guadalajara to Tijuana, Mexico captured footage of one of the missile’s illuminated projectiles flying across the twilit horizon

 It goes through two distinct stage separations during its flight. One of its components is seen falling away as the missile’s third stage, its warhead deployment stage, advances on its westward course.   

Trident missiles are fired from surfaced submarines and they shoot into space before fragmenting into multiple separate explosive warheads, which can each fall within 100 yards of their designated target.

The disbursement of multiple warheads makes it harder for enemy combatants to focus their anti-missile defense systems on a single target, making it more likely the intended target will be destroyed.

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The USS Nebraska submarine - stationed off the coast of southern California - launched at least four Trident II ballistic missiles between September 4-6

The USS Nebraska submarine – stationed off the coast of southern California – launched at least four Trident II ballistic missiles between September 4-6

An unarmed Trident II D5 missile launches from the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Nebraska off the coast of San Diego, California, on September 4

An unarmed Trident II D5 missile launches from the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Nebraska off the coast of San Diego, California, on September 4

The D5 is the sixth generation in the Trident submarine-launched ballistic missile series. Each D5 Trident missile costs $30.9 million to make. Currently, they're only deployed on U.S. and UK submarines

The D5 is the sixth generation in the Trident submarine-launched ballistic missile series. Each D5 Trident missile costs $30.9 million to make. Currently, they’re only deployed on U.S. and UK submarines

The U.S. has been preparing to field a new version of the Trident II with more targeted, less destructive warheads amid the nation’s renewed arms race with Russia.

What’s unique about this missile is its reduced destructive force, aka yield or yield – designed to make a more targeted impact while delivering nuclear armaments.

The new missile’s depressed, low-altitude flight path may also help it survive potential enemy anti-ballistic missile defense tactics and increase the missile’s accuracy at the sacrifice of damage, according to The Drive

The D5 is the sixth generation in the Trident submarine-launched ballistic missile series, which was created 60 years ago, according to the U.S. Navy.

Each D5 Trident missile costs $30.9 million to make. Currently, they’re only deployed on U.S. and UK submarines, according to the Navy. 

North Korea and China have also been testing and showcasing their nuclear arsenals in recent weeks.

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