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Canon’s small, clippable Ivy Rec camera will be available on October 16th

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Canon’s Ivy Rec portable camera will start shipping on October 16th for $129.99 in the US. You might remember this little camera from our post back in July, when Canon launched its Indiegogo campaign for the device. The main appeal here is that it’s a clippable, shockproof, and waterproof camera that, on paper, sounds like a good alternative to pulling your expensive phone out for every opportunity to snap a picture. Canon says that an empty square space on the clip acts as a viewfinder of sorts.

As for whether the Ivy Rec can take photos that compare with the cameras on the latest phones, like the iPhone 11 Pro or the upcoming Pixel 4, we’ll need to test it to find out. It has a 13-megapixel 1/3-inch CMOS sensor in a fixed-focus lens, and shoots photos in 4:3 or 1:1 aspect ratio. For video, it can record 1080p / 60 fps video in 16:9 aspect ratio with a 10-minute recording limit per video file. The Ivy Rec offers Bluetooth and Wi-Fi compatibility to send photos and videos over to your phone via Canon’s Mini Cam app.


On the opposite side of the lens, Canon has implemented a dial that lets you switch between photo and video modes, as well as turning on its Wi-Fi and Bluetooth settings to connect with your phone. The Ivy Rec saves your photos on microSD cards, which shouldn’t be a hardship — you can currently get a 64GB microSD card on Amazon for $11. The camera’s 660mAh battery can be recharged via its Micro USB port on the bottom, located next to the microSD port.

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Best Buy says that the Ivy Rec will begin shipping October 16th, while B&H Photo says it will begin shipping its orders on the 20th.

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