in

Immigrant says ICE staff only gave him IBUPROFEN when he started bleeding from his eyes and ears

Loading...

An indigenous Guatemalan man who fled to the US after surviving a gunshot wound to the head claims ICE officials at a San Diego detention center only offered him Ibuprofen when he started periodically bleeding from his eyes, ears and nose, with a suspected brain hemorrhage.

Identified only as Rolando, 27, the asylum-seeker fled to the US as part of a migrant caravan earlier this year, hoping to flee torture and persecution in his home country two years after he was shot, the Guardian reported.

Rolando persevered through blinding headaches and dizziness throughout the several thousand mile journey to the US – crippling side-effects coming as a direct result of his brushing with death.

But by the time he arrived at the San Ysidro port of entry, Rolando said his health started to rapidly deteriorate. Some days he would bleed from his eyes, ears and nose; other days he’d lie on the floor, crippled by dizziness or struggling to remain conscious.

An indigenous man who fled Guatemala after surviving a gunshot wound to the head claims ICE officials at a San Diego detention center only offered him one form of medical treatment when he periodically bled from his eyes and ears with suspected brain hemorrhaging: Ibuprofen (Filed photo - pictured: A detainee stands in a cell at Otay Mesa immigration detention center in San Diego)

An indigenous man who fled Guatemala after surviving a gunshot wound to the head claims ICE officials at a San Diego detention center only offered him one form of medical treatment when he periodically bled from his eyes and ears with suspected brain hemorrhaging: Ibuprofen (Filed photo – pictured: A detainee stands in a cell at Otay Mesa immigration detention center in San Diego)

Identified only as Rolando, 27, the asylum-seeker fled to the US as part of a migrant caravan earlier this year, hoping to flee torture and persecution in his home country, two years after he was shot (pictured: Honduran migrants heading in a caravan to the US, as the leave Arriaga on their way to San Pedro Tapanatepec, in southern Mexico on October 27, 2018)

Identified only as Rolando, 27, the asylum-seeker fled to the US as part of a migrant caravan earlier this year, hoping to flee torture and persecution in his home country, two years after he was shot (pictured: Honduran migrants heading in a caravan to the US, as the leave Arriaga on their way to San Pedro Tapanatepec, in southern Mexico on October 27, 2018)

Immigration authorities responded by locking the 27-year-old up in solitary confinement and jailing him for several months at the Otay Mesa detention center – run by private company CoreCivic – where he was given fleeting access to medical staff and medicine, records obtained by the Guardian show.

‘I feared I was going to die,’ Rolando told the outlet, adding that he didn’t want his full name to be disclosed because he’s been receiving death threats. ‘I thought in this country, there is really good medical care … but I wasn’t getting any treatment.’

Rolando’s medical records show the facility’s staff attempted to treat the bleeding from his eyes, ears and nose with higher and higher dosages of ibuprofen, an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug.

He says he was repeatedly told by medical officials ‘We don’t know what’s wrong with you,’ though his treatment planned never altered.

It’s currently unclear how many days Rolando spent in solitary confinement, though he says he spent all day in a small cell with no window to the outside world.

All of his meals were given to him through a small hatch of his locked cell door.

‘I didn’t even know what was night and what was day,’ he said. ‘I was sick already, but I was starting to get worse … Nobody was coming to see me.’

But by the time he arrived at the San Ysidro port of entry, Rolando said his health started to rapidly deteriorate. Some days he would bleed from his eyes, ears and nose; other days he’d lie on the floor, crippled by dizziness or struggling to remain conscious. Immigration authorities responded by locking the 27-year-old up in solitary confinement and jailing him for several months at the Otay Mesa detention center (above) - run by private company CoreCivic - where he was given fleeting access to medical staff and medicine

But by the time he arrived at the San Ysidro port of entry, Rolando said his health started to rapidly deteriorate. Some days he would bleed from his eyes, ears and nose; other days he’d lie on the floor, crippled by dizziness or struggling to remain conscious. Immigration authorities responded by locking the 27-year-old up in solitary confinement and jailing him for several months at the Otay Mesa detention center (above) – run by private company CoreCivic – where he was given fleeting access to medical staff and medicine

Rolando’s medical records show the facility's staff attempted to treat the bleeding from his eyes, ears and nose with higher and higher dosages of ibuprofen, an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug (pictured: Detainees are seen at Otay Mesa immigration detention center)

Rolando’s medical records show the facility’s staff attempted to treat the bleeding from his eyes, ears and nose with higher and higher dosages of ibuprofen, an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug (pictured: Detainees are seen at Otay Mesa immigration detention center)

It’s currently unclear how many days Rolando spent in solitary confinement, though he says he spent all day in a small cell with no window to the outside world. All of his meals were given to him through a small hatch of his locked cell door

It’s currently unclear how many days Rolando spent in solitary confinement, though he says he spent all day in a small cell with no window to the outside world. All of his meals were given to him through a small hatch of his locked cell door

Rolando’s attorney Annie Rios, of Al Otro Lado, told the Guardian the treatment her client endured is ‘unbelievable, almost too absurd to be true, but it’s not only documented – it’s the government’s own records.’

Loading...

As of August, ICE had refused to release Rolando while his asylum case was pending, despite his ailing health and desperate need for urgent medical attention.

One doctor wrote that he was a ‘serious patient that presents with significant complexity of risk’, believing him to be suffering from a brain hemorrhage.

Rolando had no criminal history back in Guatemala or immigration violations.

While at a soccer game in 2016, Rolando was shot in the head. His attackers left a written death threat over his lifeless body, referencing his father’s murder, who was killed shortly after his birth in 1992.

He narrowly survived and was forced into hiding, unable to seek medical attention. Rolando said he had to remove the bullet from his head instead.

‘I don’t have anyone left,’ Rolando told the Guardian, saying coming to the US was his only option. ‘Giving me an opportunity to be here is giving me an opportunity to stay alive.’

Rolando escaped to Mexico last year and joined a migrant caravan, eventually arriving in Tijuana, where he became stranded because of the the Trump administration’s metering policy, which limits how many people can ask for asylum at U.S. ports of entry each day

Rolando escaped to Mexico last year and joined a migrant caravan, eventually arriving in Tijuana, where he became stranded because of the the Trump administration’s metering policy, which limits how many people can ask for asylum at U.S. ports of entry each day

As of August, ICE had refused to release Rolando while his asylum case was pending, despite his ailing health and desperate need for urgent medical attention. One doctor wrote that he was a ‘serious patient that presents with significant complexity of risk’, believing him to be suffering from a brain hemorrhage. Rolando had no criminal history back in Guatemala or immigration violations (file photo of Otay Mesa detainees)

As of August, ICE had refused to release Rolando while his asylum case was pending, despite his ailing health and desperate need for urgent medical attention. One doctor wrote that he was a ‘serious patient that presents with significant complexity of risk’, believing him to be suffering from a brain hemorrhage. Rolando had no criminal history back in Guatemala or immigration violations (file photo of Otay Mesa detainees)

Rolando escaped to Mexico last year and joined a migrant caravan, eventually arriving in Tijuana, where he became stranded because of the the Trump administration’s metering policy, which limits how many people can ask for asylum at U.S. ports of entry each day.

The waiting-list has more than 10,000 people on it, with only a few dozen allowed to cross daily. Wait times are expected to take between six and nine months.

Rolando was eventually moved onto San Diego, where he escaped ICE’s Otay Mesa detention center alive and now awaits an asylum hearing.

However, he isn’t alone in his claims of medical neglect.

In February, more than 70 detainees signed on to a letter speaking out against sordid conditions at the facility, in which they alleged they had experienced racism, discrimination, and medical neglect.

In 2018, a coalition of immigration advocacy groups released a report finding that substandard medical care contributed to the deaths of eight immigrants in ICE custody between December 2015 and April 2017, including one at Otay Mesa.

Source link

Loading...

Leave a Reply

‘Selfish’ pensioner, 67, is jailed for eight years for gross neglect manslaughter 

Taylor Swift proves to be the ultimate cat lady as she snuggles with Jonathan Van Ness’ pets