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Donald Trump should go to PRISON according to majority of Democrats in early voting primary states

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Donald Trump should go to PRISON according to majority of Democrats in early voting primary states as just 1 in 6 don’t want the president impeached

  • The Majority of Democratic primary voters in early primary states think Trump should be imprisoned on top of his potential impeachment
  • In Iowa, 53 per cent say Trump should go to prison
  • Fifty per cent in New Hampshire and 54 per cent in South Carolina feel the same 
  • The cast majority of these likely Democratic voters support impeachment
  • In Iowa 79 per cent said they support impeachment, 75 per cent in New Hampshire and 72 per cent in South Carolina

The majority of Democrats in early voting states not only want Donald Trump impeached, but also want to see him go to prison.

In Iowa, the first caucus state, 53 per cent of respondents to a Firehouse Strategies/Optimus poll released Monday said they want Trump imprisoned, and another 50 per cent in the first primary state of New Hampshire said the same.

In the early primary state of South Carolina, 54 per cent agreed with the poll’s prompted statement: ‘Some members of Congress have stated that President Trump should not only be impeached, but also imprisoned.’

Also in the poll, an overwhelming majority of Democratic primary voters in these early voting states exhibited support for the House’s impeachment inquiry into the president.

In Iowa 79 per cent said they support impeachment, with 75 per cent saying the same in New Hampshire and 72 per cent in South Carolina.

The Majority of Democratic primary voters in early primary states think Trump should be imprisoned on top of his potential impeachment

The Majority of Democratic primary voters in early primary states think Trump should be imprisoned on top of his potential impeachment

The strong sentiment from the left comes as the president finds himself finally facing a formal impeachment inquiry from the Democrat-controlled House.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the proceedings at the end of last month, following revelations that Trump engaged in a call with his Ukrainian counterpart where he pressured President Volodymyr Zelensky to probe his political rival Joe Biden and his family.

The survey was conducted October 8-10, as the impeachment inquiry continues to broaden.

In the poll, 1,765 likely 2020 Democratic presidential primary voters in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina were surveyed – all were contacted either by landline or cell phone calls or through text messages.

Trump insists Biden and his son Hunter are engaged in corruption in Ukraine and China linked to business dealings in those countries.

Hunter Biden served on the board for Ukrainian natural gas firm Burisma Holdings from 2014 to earlier this year. He also was on the board of a Chinese-backed private equity company. He flew to China with his father aboard Air Force Two in 2013.

He announced over the weekend he was stepping down from the board position at BHR (Shanghai) Equity Investment Fund Management Company, where he insists he was unpaid while his father was in office.

Over the weekend, Hunter announced he would be stepping down from his position on the board of a Chinese-backed private equity company at the end of this month.  

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced at the end of September the Democratic-controlled House was opening an impeachment inquiry into the president following revelations he urged his Ukrainian counterpart to dig up dirt on political rival Joe Biden

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced at the end of September the Democratic-controlled House was opening an impeachment inquiry into the president following revelations he urged his Ukrainian counterpart to dig up dirt on political rival Joe Biden

Hunter has denied playing a role in forming the Chinese company or having equity in it while his father was in office and insists the board position was unpaid. 

Although Biden and his son are facing scrutiny for potential corruption and conflicts of interest, more attention has been focused on the president asking foreign governments to assist in digging up dirt on one of the most likely 2020 Democratic opponents. 

Trump has insisted he does not thing he will face Biden in the 2020 general elections and asserts his call with Zelensky was ‘perfect.’ He also said, as an excuse for asking Ukraine and China for help investigating, that he has a responsibility to stop corruption.

There has not been a lot of national polling on opinions for the president’s imprisonment, but some Democratic lawmakers insist impeachment is not enough and the president should face jail time for his actions.

The margins of error for this question is plus or minus 3.6 per cent in Iowa, plus or minus 3.7 per cent in New Hampshire and plus or minus 3.7 per cent in South Carolina.

Support for impeachment has continued to climb ever since Pelosi announced the inquiry.

Democrats claim there was a quid pro quo set during the president’s conversation with Zelensky. The administration froze military aid to Ukraine a few days before their July 25 phone call, and Democrats insists he was holding the millions in aide in exchange for the Ukrainian’s help in probing Biden and potentially influencing the 2020 elections.

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Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina are important states in presidential primary elections as they set the stage for the rest of the election.

The Iowa caucus will be held February 3 of next year, New Hampshire’s primary is on February 11 and South Carolinians will hit the voting booths on February 29.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? THE VERY COMPLICATED STEPS INVOLVED IN IMPEACHING DONALD TRUMP

Nancy Pelosi announcing a formal impeachment investigation is only the start of what will be an epic legal and constitutional clash.

Here is how impeachment goes from here.

1) Investigations step up

Six committees are now tasked by Pelosi with investigating Donald Trump with the intention of deciding whether he should be impeached. They are the House Judiciary, Oversight, Intelligence, Ways and Means, Financial Services and Foreign Affairs committees. All of them are now likely to issue a flurry of subpoenas which is certain to lead to a new: 

2) Court battle over subpoenas – which could go to the Supreme Court

The Trump administration has so far resisted subpoenas by claiming executive privilege and is certain to continue to do so. Federal judges are already dealing with litigation over subpoenas for Trump’s tax and financial records and many more cases are likely to follow. But the courts have never settled the limits of executive privilege and whether an impeachment inquiry effectively gives Congress more power to overcome it. If Trump fights as hard as he can, it is likely to make its way to the Supreme Court. In the meantime, expect: 

3) More hearings

Democrats know they need to convince the public that Trump needs to be put on trial and the best way to do that is hearings like those which electrified the nation during Watergate. They botched the Mueller hearing but if they produce question and answer sessions with people from Trump-world which cause public outrage, they are on their way to:

4) Drawing up formal articles of impeachment in committee 

The charge sheet for impeachment – the ‘articles’ – set out what Trump is formally accused of. It has no set format – it can be as long or as short as Congress decides. Three such set of articles have been drawn up – for Andrew Johnson on 1868, Richard Nixon in 1974, and Bill Clinton in 1998. Johnson’s were the most extensive at 11, Nixon faced three, and Bill Clinton four but with a series of numbered charges in each article. Once drawn up, the judicial committee votes on them and if approved, sends them to the House for:

5) Full floor vote on impeachment

The constitution says the House needs a simple majority to proceed, but has to vote on each article. Nixon quit before such a vote so Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton are the only precedent. The House passed two out of the three articles against Clinton and all 11 against Johnson. Passing even one article leads to:

6) Senate impeachment trial

Even if the Senate is clearly not in favor of removing the president, it has to stage a trial if the House votes for impeachment. The hearing is in not in front of the full Senate, but ‘evidentiary committees’ – in theory at least similar to the existing Senate committees. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presides over it, but the procedures are set by senators. Members of the House prosecute Trump as ‘managers,’ bringing witnesses and presenting evidence to set out their case against the president. The president can defend himself, or, as Clinton did, use attorneys to cross-examine the witnesses. The committee or committees report to the full Senate. Then it can debate in public or deliberate in private on the guilt or innocence of the president. It holds a single open floor vote which will deliver:

7) The verdict

Impeachment must be by two-thirds of the Senate. Voting for impeachment on any one article is good enough to remove the president from office. There is no appeal. 

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