in

AFL great Luke Darcy blames lockdowns for death of father David Darcy in clash with Daniel Andrews

AFL media personality Luke Darcy has blamed the coronavirus lockdowns for killing his sporting legend father.

In an emotional clash with Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, Darcy said his elderly father David Darcy, who played 133 games for the Western Bulldogs, lost his will to live during Melbourne’s Stage Four restrictions.

‘I lost my 78-year-old father, Premier, during this time and you know what happened to him?,’ Luke Darcy told his Melbourne Triple M listeners.

‘He was a very similar person to you actually, Premier.

‘He loved his golf. He was isolated in his home. He wasn’t dying from this.

Scroll down for audio 

AFL media personality Luke Darcy (pictured with wife Rebecca) has blamed the coronavirus lockdowns for killing his father - another sporting legend

AFL media personality Luke Darcy (pictured with wife Rebecca) has blamed the coronavirus lockdowns for killing his father – another sporting legend








‘He was dying from the isolation and the loneliness because he couldn’t get to the gym, he couldn’t run his business that he built for his family his entire life.’ 

Despite the harrowing account Mr Andrews spoke over Luke Darcy, a former Western Bulldogs captain, who nonetheless continued telling his story.

‘What was happening was the policies were causing harm, Premier,’ Darcy said.

Instead of offering his condolences, Mr Andrews replied: ‘Let me finish the point I’m making.

‘There is a view, “Oh, well, we should lockdown aged care and only lock down aged care”,’ he said.

‘And that everyone else can open up. This is not just relevant to older people.’  

David Darcy died on August 1. He was a prominent footballer himself. He played with the Western Bulldogs from 1963-66, and again from 1968-71. 

He played 133 games for the Bulldogs and four times for Victoria.

The late Darcy senior also played with South Adelaide in 1967, and coached there in 1972 and 1973.

In an emotional clash with Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, Darcy said his elderly father David Darcy (pictured during the 1960s), who played 133 games for the Western Bulldogs, lost his will to live during Melbourne's Stage Four restrictions

In an emotional clash with Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, Darcy said his elderly father David Darcy (pictured during the 1960s), who played 133 games for the Western Bulldogs, lost his will to live during Melbourne’s Stage Four restrictions

His 45-year-old son Luke Darcy played 226 games for the Western Bulldogs, being awarded Players’ Association Player of the Year in 2002 when he was also named in the All Australian team.

After retirement in 2007, he became a media personality and a board member of the Melbourne AFL club he played for. 

Luke Darcy’s Triple M Hot Breakfast co-host Eddie McGuire lost his mother Bridie during the same week in early August. 

Eddie McGuire’s older brother Frank McGuire is a Labor MP in the Victorian Parliament, who holds the northern Melbourne seat of Broadmeadows – former ALP premier John Brumby’s old electorate. 

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews continued talking over Luke Darcy as he talked about the death of his father and failed to offer him any condolences after he had told his story

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews continued talking over Luke Darcy as he talked about the death of his father and failed to offer him any condolences after he had told his story 

Darcy took Mr Andrews to task after he extended Melbourne’s Stage Four lockdowns  by another two weeks September 28. 

Luke Darcy played 226 games for the Western Bulldogs, being awarded Players' Association Player of the Year in 2002 when he was also named in the All Australian team. After retirement in 2007, he became a media personality and a board member of the Melbourne AFL club he played for

Luke Darcy played 226 games for the Western Bulldogs, being awarded Players’ Association Player of the Year in 2002 when he was also named in the All Australian team. After retirement in 2007, he became a media personality and a board member of the Melbourne AFL club he played for

The Premier, from Labor’s Socialist Left faction, announced a road map on Sunday that would only allow a significant easing in coming weeks if the state recorded fewer than five new daily cases during the final fortnight of this month.

Luke Darcy argued the stricter lockdowns would fail to completely eradicate COVID-19 and argued a suppression strategy with better contact tracing was better.

‘There’s an incredible study that’s been done in The Lancet suggesting that extreme lockdowns have the opposite effect and do not work and they cause immeasurable harm and actually when you open up again, you will get more cases,’ he said.

A Lancet article published last month argued stricter lockdowns were unlikely to completely eliminate COVID-19.

‘I agree that a hard lockdown strategy will only slow down and delay, but not entirely eliminate, cases of the infection. Indeed, countries might not be able to afford to enact lockdown with no end in sight,’ Raja Ramanchandran said.

Even supporters of the Stage Four lockdowns are critical, with the  Grattan Institute think tank’s health program director Dr Stephen Duckett disagreeing with the 8pm to 5am curfew. 

MELBOURNE’S ROADMAP OUT OF COVID-19 LOCKDOWN – WHAT YOU WILL BE ABLE TO DO AND WHEN:

Step one: The first step will come in to place on September 13.

Step two: The second step will be implemented when Melbourne has 30-50 COVID-19 cases a day on average over the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on September 28. 

Step three: The move to step three will occur when there is a daily statewide average of five new cases over the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on October 26.

Step four: The move to step four will come when there have been no new COVID-19 cases in the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on November 23.

COVID Normal: After 28 days of no new COVID-19 cases, things will return to normal. 

Step one – 11.59pm on September 13:

Curfew will be eased to 9pm-5am

People can still only leave home for the four reasons (shopping, exercise, work and care or medical attention)

Public gatherings increased to two people, or a household, for a maximum of two hours

 Singles can have one nominated person to their home as part of the ‘singles social bubble’ 

Childcare and early educators to remain closed

Schools will continue to learn remotely unless they have exemptions

 Adult education to continue to be done remotely, unless they have exemption

 Only go to work if you are in a permitted industry 

– Cafes and restaurants will continue with take away only

– Retail businesses will remain open for essential shopping, with others only operating with click and collect

– Only one person per household can do the essential shopping 

Step two – September 28:

Public gatherings increase again to five people from a maximum of two households

Childcare and early educators can re-open

Schools to continue with remote learning, but Prep to Grade Two and Year 11 and Year 12 students will gradually return to class in Term 4 

 There will be an increase to permitted workplaces

Step three – October 26:

Curfew is no longer in place

There are no restrictions on leaving home

Public gatherings increase to 10 people together outdoors

 A ‘household bubble’ will be introduced, so five people from one house can visit another 

Remote learning to continue, but Grades 3 to Year 11 can gradually return to class

– Adult education to continue to be done remotely, but hands on classes will see a phased return to onsite 

 Work from home is encouraged

– Up to 10 people can eat together at restaurants and cafes, with the majority of tables outdoor

– Retail shops to reopen, with hairdresses operating under safety measures but beauty stores to remain closed

– Real estate agents can conduct private inspections by appointment

– The one person per household limit on shopping is to be revoked 

Step four – November 23:

Public gatherings to increase to 50 people outdoors

 Up to 20 visitors can attend a home at any one time

 All adult education will return to onsite with safety measures in place

– Groups limited to 20 indoors and a maximum of 50 patrons per venue

– All retail stores to reopen, while real estate agents can operate with safety measures and by keeping a record of attendants

Step five – COVID normal:

Public gatherings have no restriction

 There will also be no restriction on visitors to homes

– Phased return to onsite work for work from home workers

  Schools to reopen as normal

– Restrictions on hospitality removed, but venues to continue keeping records 

Source link

Government's £32 MILLION bet on futuristic healthcare technology

Woman who self-harmed after bullies said she wouldn't get a boyfriend battles to win Miss England