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Angels employee spotted after claiming he gave opioids to Tyler Skaggs

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The Los Angeles Angels employee who claims he gave opioids to Tyler Skaggs has been pictured for the first time since revealing he has spoken to the authorities investigating the late pitcher’s death. 

Eric Kay, who works within the team’s PR department, was spotted in Orange County on Monday. 

The 24-year-old stepped out to visit an ATM just days after he released a statement revealing he had provided drugs to Skaggs prior to his death and that the team knew of the pitcher’s opioid use. 

When asked about Skaggs’ death on Monday, Kay would not comment other than to say he stood by his earlier statement. 

Eric Kay, who works within the Los Angeles' PR department, was spotted on Monday in California after revealing he had spoken with authorities investigating Tyler Skaggs' death

Eric Kay, who works within the Los Angeles’ PR department, was spotted on Monday in California after revealing he had spoken with authorities investigating Tyler Skaggs’ death

Tyler Skaggs was found dead in his Texas hotel room in July just hours before his team was scheduled to play a four-game series against the Texas Rangers

Tyler Skaggs was found dead in his Texas hotel room in July just hours before his team was scheduled to play a four-game series against the Texas Rangers

Kay revealed in a statement to ESPN on Saturday that he frequently abused oxycodone with Skaggs for two years before the star pitcher’s sudden death in July.

Skaggs was found dead in his Texas hotel room in July just hours before his team was scheduled to play a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. 

His official cause of death revealed he died suffocating on his own vomit after taking a lethal mix of alcohol, fentanyl, and oxycodone. 

Many Angels players and staffers expressed shock after learning that Skaggs had drugs in his system, but Kay said he had been taking pills with the star as far back as 2017. 

Kay, who is reportedly on paid leave as he deals with his own opioid addiction, said he was coming forward because it is ‘time for everyone to stand up and take responsibility’.

He told the Drug Enforcement Agency that he believes several other Angels players also used opioids.

Kay interviewed with DEA agents in both Dallas and Los Angeles field offices in September. 

He reportedly told them that he illegally obtained six oxycodone pills and gave three to Skaggs just days before he left on the fateful trip to Texas. 

The 24-year-old stepped out to visit an ATM just days after he released a statement revealing he had provided drugs to Skaggs prior to his death and that the team knew of the pitcher's opioid use

The 24-year-old stepped out to visit an ATM just days after he released a statement revealing he had provided drugs to Skaggs prior to his death and that the team knew of the pitcher's opioid use

The 24-year-old stepped out to visit an ATM just days after he released a statement revealing he had provided drugs to Skaggs prior to his death and that the team knew of the pitcher’s opioid use

When asked about Skaggs' death on Monday, Kay would not comment other than to say he stood by his earlier statement

When asked about Skaggs’ death on Monday, Kay would not comment other than to say he stood by his earlier statement

Kay, however, said he does not believe that they were the ones in Skaggs’ system at the time that he died. He said the pitcher allegedly texted him on the day he departed for Texas requesting more pills but Kay claims he could not fulfill the request.  

He further claimed that he was in Skaggs’ hotel room on the night he died and that he saw the star snorted three lines of crushed opioids in front of him. 

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Kay has long been struggling with his own addiction problems and is currently on paid leave with the Angels as he seeks treatment.

Kay claimed that five other Angels players also used opiates while with the team, though the identities of the players named by Kay have not been made public. 

He claims he wasn’t the only Angels staffer with knowledge of Skaggs’ drug use. 

Kay allegedly told DEA investigators that he discussed Skaggs’ opioid habits with Tim Mead, the former Angels vice president of communications and Kay’s supervisor, in 2017.

Mead – who left the Angels in June – steadfastly denied that accusation.

‘I have had a lot of conversations with Eric Kay about a lot of things, but opioids and Tyler Skaggs were not one of them,’ he said.

He also denied knowing that Skaggs used opioids before his death.

Kay revealed in a statement to ESPN on Saturday that he frequently abused oxycodone with Skaggs for two years before the star pitcher's sudden death in July

Kay revealed in a statement to ESPN on Saturday that he frequently abused oxycodone with Skaggs for two years before the star pitcher's sudden death in July

Kay revealed in a statement to ESPN on Saturday that he frequently abused oxycodone with Skaggs for two years before the star pitcher’s sudden death in July

Kay claimed that five other Angels players also used opiates while with the team, though the identities of the players named by Kay have not been made public

Kay claimed that five other Angels players also used opiates while with the team, though the identities of the players named by Kay have not been made public 

‘We have never heard that any employee was providing illegal narcotics to any player, or that any player was seeking illegal narcotics,’ Angels President John Carpino said in a statement. 

‘The Angels maintain a strict, zero tolerance policy regarding the illicit use of drugs for both players and staff. Every one of our players must also abide by the MLB Joint Drug Agreement. We continue to mourn the loss of Tyler and fully cooperate with the authorities as they continue their investigation.’ 

Last month, teammate Mike Trout said he was stunned to hear the results of the toxicology report and was unaware that Skaggs was even on opioids in the first place.

‘We didn’t know he was going through this. Just a tough situation when this came out. Tough to put your mind to it,’ the center fielder said to MLB News.

Oxycodone is banned pursuant to Major League Baseball’s Joint Drug Agreement while fentanyl is labeled as a ‘drug of abuse’ under the agreement.

‘Obviously, it doesn’t change my view on Tyler. He made a big impact on my life, this team. I was kind of shocked when the news came out like that. That’s tough, but it doesn’t change the feeling I have for him and the way he impacted my life,’ Trout said.

‘Obviously, if I knew I would definitely have said something or did something,’ Trout said. ‘It’s tough. You love Tyler. We didn’t know he was going through this. Just a tough situation when this came out. Tough to put your mind to it. But it doesn’t change the way I feel about Tyler and the way he impacted my life.’

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