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Australians donate $210,000 to family forced to pay $16k for quarantine to see their dying dad

Australians have donated almost $210,000 to pay for four children’s coronavirus hotel quarantine so they can see their dad before he dies. 

Mark Keanes, from Brisbane, was diagnosed with terminal brain and lung cancer in late July and the doctors believe he won’t make it past Christmas.

The 39-year-old’s children are in Sydney and it is his final wish to see them before he dies.

Mark Keans - who has terminal cancer - is pictured with his children (L-R) Noah 13, Caitlyn 11, Caleb 11, and Isaac, 7. His family have been quoted $16,000 in quarantine fees to travel to Queensland to say goodbye to him

Mark Keans – who has terminal cancer – is pictured with his children (L-R) Noah 13, Caitlyn 11, Caleb 11, and Isaac, 7. His family have been quoted $16,000 in quarantine fees to travel to Queensland to say goodbye to him

Health authorities had earlier said only one of Mr Keans’ four Sydney-based children – all of whom are under the age of 13 – could cross the border to see him one last time. 

Queensland Health did not at first respond to multiple requests for an exemption from the truck driver’s family, but have now told them they can drive into the state and pay for two weeks quarantine in a Brisbane hotel.  

The state’s standard quarantine fees are $4,620 for two adults and two children. 

Mr Keans was diagnosed a month ago with an inoperable cancer and is not expected to live until Christmas. Earlier, his family were told only one of his children would be given permission to cross into Queensland to see him in his final moments

Mr Keans was diagnosed a month ago with an inoperable cancer and is not expected to live until Christmas. Earlier, his family were told only one of his children would be given permission to cross into Queensland to see him in his final moments

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