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BLM: What cops involved in murders of black men are doing now

The death of George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer on May 25 has sparked a nationwide reckoning about police brutality and racial justice. 

Four cops have been charged over Floyd’s death including Derek Chauvin, who is accused of second degree murder for holding his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes during the arrest. 

But the reality is that in most cases, police involved in such killings do not face punishment. 

Many remain on the force, some receive huge payoffs and others hang on to their jobs for years. 

DailyMail.com has looked back at some of the most controversial killings of African-Americans by cops in recent years to see what justice was meted out to the officers – if any at all. 

 
Michael Brown was shot dead aged 18 in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014

Michael Brown was shot dead aged 18 in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014

Michael Brown

The white cop who shot dead Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014 is now working as an insurance agent who receives rave reviews from his clients.

Darren Wilson switched to selling insurance in Missouri in 2015 – the year after he resigned from the force.

According to public records, Wilson made the career change and undertook the qualifications needed to do the job.

An online review says: ‘Darren Wilson is the best agent, always looking out for your best interest. I would recommend him to anyone. Thank you D, for all you do’.

Wilson resigned from the Ferguson police force in November 2014, five days after a grand jury decided not to indict him over the killing of 18-year-old Brown.

Wilson stopped Brown and a friend on the street and a struggle ensued, during which Wilson’s lawyers claimed Brown attacked him and tried to grab his gun.

White ex-cop Darren Wilson is now working as an insurance agent who receives rave reviews from his clients. Darren Wilson switched to selling insurance in Missouri in 2015 – the year after he resigned from the force

Brown’s family claimed he had surrendered and his death was murder.

The killing led to weeks of protests in Ferguson and across America and is seen as a pivotal moment in the struggle for police reform.

A friend of Wilson’s told DailyMail.com that he is ‘doing well’. The friend said: ‘He is living his life and he doesn’t talk about what happened very much, which is probably for the best.

‘He still sometimes gets recognized so he has to keep things pretty quiet.’

Wilson and his lawyer Neil Bruntrager did not return requests for comment. 

 

Samuel DuBose

Smiling at a NASCAR race while wearing a Trump tank top, this is the former University of Cincinnati police officer involved in one of the most shocking killings of a black man by cops in recent years.

Ray Tensing grins as he hugs his fiancée at the event in 2018, three years after he shot dead Samuel DuBose, 43, an unarmed black motorist.

In another photo, Tensing poses with a gun while on a hike in the mountains.

Smiling at a NASCAR race while wearing a Trump tank top in 2018, this is former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing (pictured with partner) involved in one of the most  shocking killings of a black man by cops in recent years. Tensing was charged with murder and was tried twice but jurors could not reach a verdict either time. Prosecutors decided not to try for a third time

Smiling at a NASCAR race while wearing a Trump tank top in 2018, this is former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing (pictured with partner) involved in one of the most  shocking killings of a black man by cops in recent years. Tensing was charged with murder and was tried twice but jurors could not reach a verdict either time. Prosecutors decided not to try for a third time

Samuel DuBose, 43, an unarmed black motorist, was shot dead by Tensing in Cincinnati in 2015 during a traffic stop for a missing front license plate

Tensing claimed Dubose started to drive off and his body was being dragged along, but the body camera video appeared to contradict his claim

Samuel DuBose, 43, an unarmed black motorist, was shot dead by Tensing in Cincinnati in 2015 during a traffic stop for a missing front license plate. Tensing claimed Dubose started to drive off and his body was being dragged along, but the body camera video appeared to contradict his claim

Earlier this month while much of America was rocked by protests over the killing of George Floyd, Tensing was on another hike with a friend and posted a picture of them on a clifftop.

Tensing killed DuBose in Cincinnati in 2015 during a traffic stop for a missing front license plate.

Tensing claimed Dubose started to drive off and his body was being dragged along, but the body camera video appeared to contradict his claim.

Tensing was charged with murder and was tried twice but jurors could not reach a verdict either time. Prosecutors decided not to try for a third time.

The case was dropped and Tensing got a $344,000 payout from the University of Cincinnati for back pay and legal fees – although he did have to resign from his job.

 

Eric Garner

Eric Garner was killed aged 43 after being arrested in Staten Island, New York, in 2014 for selling individual cigarettes outside a convenience store. 

New York Police Department officer Daniel Pantaleo restrained Garner in a chokehold even though Garner repeatedly said ‘I can’t breathe’, which became a slogan of the Black Lives Matter movement.

The Staten Island district attorney and the Justice Department refused to charge Pantaleo with a crime.

And incredibly, Pantaleo held on to his job for five years working desk duty with no badge and no gun until last summer when he was finally fired following a ruling by a police administrative judge.

During that time, he managed to increase his salary by $20,000 a year to $119,000.

Pantaleo has refused to let it drop even now and is currently suing to get his old job back.

Eric Garner was killed aged 43 after being arrested in Staten Island, New York, in 2014 for selling individual cigarettes outside a convenience store

He repeatedly said ‘I can’t breathe’, which became a slogan of the Black Lives Matter movement

Eric Garner was killed aged 43 after being arrested in Staten Island, New York, in 2014 for selling individual cigarettes outside a convenience store. He repeatedly said ‘I can’t breathe’, which became a slogan of the Black Lives Matter movement

New York Police Department officer Daniel Pantaleo restrained Garner in a chokehold. The Staten Island district attorney and the Justice Department refused to charge Pantaleo with a crime. And incredibly, Pantaleo held on to his job for five years working desk duty with no badge and no gun until last summer when he was fired following a ruling by a police administrative judge. During that time, he managed to increase his salary by $20k to $119,000

New York Police Department officer Daniel Pantaleo restrained Garner in a chokehold. The Staten Island district attorney and the Justice Department refused to charge Pantaleo with a crime. And incredibly, Pantaleo held on to his job for five years working desk duty with no badge and no gun until last summer when he was fired following a ruling by a police administrative judge. During that time, he managed to increase his salary by $20k to $119,000

This week after the law was changed to make NYPD officers’ disciplinary records public, it emerged he had been the subject of seven disciplinary complaints.

They included one in 2012 for a stop and frisk incident.

The last claim prior to Garner’s death was an unsubstantiated use-of-force allegation in March 2013.

Garner’s daughter Emerald called Pantaleo a ‘murderer’ and said he held onto his job for ‘five years too long’.

She told DailyMail.com: ‘After my father died we were looking for some type of justice, some type of anything to make sure that this doesn’t happen again and then George Floyd happens. It’s a slap in the face we’re still dealing with this chokehold situation five years later.’

Emerald added that with the protests over the death of George Floyd it felt like she was ‘reliving my father’s death all over’.

She said: ‘It makes it that much harder to feel like you have closure. It’s reopening the same wounds.’

 

Freddie Gray

All six officers who were charged over the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore in 2015 are still on the Baltimore Police force – and one is on the SWAT team.

Patrol officer Garrett Miller, who handcuffed Gray after he fled from their custody, has become a SWAT officer, a spokesman for the Baltimore Police force confirmed to DailyMail.com.

Another controversial promotion was given to Sgt. Alicia White, who was charged with involuntary manslaughter for allegedly failing to provide medical assistance to Gray. 

Freddie Gray was just 25 years old when he suffered a spinal injury while being transported in a police van after being found with a knife in his pocket. The incident led to riots and arson across Baltimore

Freddie Gray was just 25 years old when he suffered a spinal injury while being transported in a police van after being found with a knife in his pocket. The incident led to riots and arson across Baltimore

Patrol officer Garrett Miller, who handcuffed Gray after he fled from their custody, has become a SWAT officer, a spokesman for the Baltimore Police force confirmed

Sgt. Alicia White, who was charged with involuntary manslaughter for allegedly failing to provide medical assistance to Gray

Patrol officer Caesar Goodson, the driver of the van, is assigned to the Criminal Intelligence

All six officers who were charged over the death of Gray are still on the Baltimore Police force. Patrol officer Garrett Miller, who handcuffed Gray after he fled from their custody, has become a SWAT officer (left); Sgt. Alicia White, who was charged with involuntary manslaughter for allegedly failing to provide medical assistance to Gray (center); and Patrol officer Caesar Goodson (right), the driver of the van, is assigned to the Criminal Intelligenc

Lt. Brian Rice, the first officer to make contact with Gray, is currently assigned to the Forensics Laboratory Section

Patrol officer William Porter, who allegedly failed to secure Gray in the van with a seat belt, is assigned the Criminal Intelligence Section

Patrol officer Edward Nero, the other officer who caught Gray when he fled, is assigned to the Aviation Unit

Lt. Brian Rice, the first officer to make contact with Gray, is currently assigned to the Forensics Laboratory Section (left); Patrol officer William Porter, who allegedly failed to secure Gray in the van with a seat belt, is assigned the Criminal Intelligence Section (center) and Patrol officer Edward Nero, the other officer who caught Gray when he fled, is assigned to the Aviation Unit (right)  

She is now part of the unit assigned to implementing the Department Justice Consent Decree, which was put in place to reform the Baltimore Police Department after Gray’s death.

Gray was just 25 years old when he suffered a spinal injury while being transported in a police van after being found with a knife in his pocket.

The incident led to riots and arson across Baltimore.

None of the six officers who were charged were convicted after their cases ended in a mistrial or the charges were dropped.

Lt. Brian Rice, the first officer to make contact with Gray, is currently assigned to the Forensics Laboratory Section. 

Patrol officer William Porter, who allegedly failed to secure Gray in the van with a seat belt, is assigned the Criminal Intelligence Section. 

Patrol officer Edward Nero, the other officer who caught Gray when he fled, is assigned to the Aviation Unit.

Patrol officer Caesar Goodson, the driver of the van, is assigned to the Criminal Intelligence.

 

Tamir Rice

Tamir Rice was just 12 years old when two police officers approached him after getting a report of somebody with a gun in a park in Cleveland, Ohio in 2014. 

Although the caller said the gun was ‘probably fake’, less than two seconds after arriving, officer Timothy Loehmann shot Tamir dead. 

Loehmann was with veteran officer Frank Garmback and neither cop was charged.

Tamir Rice was just 12 years old when two police officers pulled up to him after getting a report of somebody with a gun in a park in Cleveland, Ohio in 2014

Tamir Rice was just 12 years old when two police officers pulled up to him after getting a report of somebody with a gun in a park in Cleveland, Ohio in 2014

Although the caller said the gun was ‘probably fake’, less than two seconds after arriving, officer Timothy Loehmann (pictured) shot Tamir dead

Frank Garmback was suspended for 10 days, later reduced to five. Garmback has caused more controversy since Rice’s death and last year the city of Cleveland paid out $100,000 to a resident who claimed he put her in a chokehold and punched her face during a violent arrest that used excessive force in 2010

Although the caller said the gun was ‘probably fake’, less than two seconds after arriving, officer Timothy Loehmann (left) shot Tamir dead. Frank Garmback (right) was suspended for 10 days, later reduced to five. Garmback has caused more controversy since Rice’s death and last year the city of Cleveland paid out $100,000 to a resident who claimed he put her in a chokehold and punched her face during a violent arrest that used excessive force in 2010

Loehmann was later fired for discrepancies in his job application. Garmback was suspended for 10 days, later reduced to five.

Six years later, the Cleveland Police Union is currently suing for Loehmann to get his job back. Loehmann tried to get a job with another police force but withdrew when it became public.

Richard Flanagan, the police chief for the Bellaire Police Department in Ohio, said he thought Loehmann deserved a second chance.

He said: ‘The pressures of all of this. He’s been through enough the last couple years. He cared about the community here. He didn’t want no protests, no violence, nothing of that nature.’

At the time Rice’s mother Samira said that the idea of Loehmann becoming a cop in another city was a ‘personal attack on our family’

She said: ‘Hopefully, he will not be hired as a police officer by any other state. As long as I’m living he won’t.’

Garmback has caused more controversy since Rice’s death and last year the city of Cleveland paid out $100,000 to a resident who claimed he put her in a chokehold and punched her face during a violent arrest that used excessive force in 2010.

Alton Sterling

Sterling, 37, was shot and killed during a disturbing incident in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 2016 that was captured on video. Two police officers arrived to question him about selling DVDs outside a convenience store.

Ten seconds into the video, one of the officers shouted; ‘Don’t f****** move or I’ll shoot your f***** a**’. The situation escalated and Sterling was shot dead after one officer shouted: ‘He’s got a gun!’

No charges were brought against officers Blane Salamoni and Howie Lake II. 

Sterling, 37, was shot and killed during a disturbing incident in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 2016 that was captured on video. Two police officers arrived to question him about selling DVDs outside a convenience store

Sterling, 37, was shot and killed during a disturbing incident in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 2016 that was captured on video. Two police officers arrived to question him about selling DVDs outside a convenience store

No charges were brought against officers Blane Salamoni (left) and Howie Lake II. Salamoni was fired two years later for violating police policies during the shooting and after it emerged he had a history of ‘blow ups’. The Baton Rouge Police Department said he should never have been on the force.

DailyMail.com can reveal that Lake is still on active duty and is assigned to the Baton Rouge 5th District where officers are responsible for the downtown area of the city.

No charges were brought against officers Blane Salamoni (left) and Howie Lake II (right). Salamoni was fired two years later for violating police policies during the shooting and after it emerged he had a history of ‘blow ups’. The Baton Rouge Police Department said he should never have been on the force. DailyMail.com can reveal that Lake is still on active duty and is assigned to the Baton Rouge 5th District where officers are responsible for the downtown area of the city

Salamoni was fired two years later for violating police policies during the shooting and after it emerged he had a history of ‘blow ups’. The Baton Rouge Police Department said he should never have been on the force. 

He is now appealing his firing.

DailyMail.com can reveal that Lake is still on active duty and is assigned to the Baton Rouge 5th District where officers are responsible for the downtown area of the city.

This includes bicycle patrol, misdemeanor investigation, prisoner processing, security of public buildings and the housing authority division, which deals with incidents in housing projects.

Philando Castile

Castile was shot dead in 2016 after being pulled over for a traffic stop by a police officer in Falcon Heights, Minnesota in an incident streamed live on Facebook by Castile’s girlfriend. 

Officer Jeronimo Yanez claimed he thought Castile, 26, was reaching for his gun but his girlfriend claimed he was going for his ID. 

Yanez was cleared of second degree murder and received a $48,000 settlement to voluntarily leave his job.

Castile was shot dead in 2016 after being pulled over for a traffic stop by a police officer in Falcon Heights, Minnesota in an incident streamed live on Facebook by Castile's girlfriend

Castile was shot dead in 2016 after being pulled over for a traffic stop by a police officer in Falcon Heights, Minnesota in an incident streamed live on Facebook by Castile’s girlfriend

Officer Jeronimo Yanez (pictured) claimed he thought Castile, 26, was reaching for his gun but his girlfriend claimed he was going for his ID. Yanez was cleared of second degree murder and received a $48,000 settlement to voluntarily leave his job

Officer Jeronimo Yanez (pictured) claimed he thought Castile, 26, was reaching for his gun but his girlfriend claimed he was going for his ID. Yanez was cleared of second degree murder and received a $48,000 settlement to voluntarily leave his job

 

Stephon Clark

Clark was killed by two Sacramento police officers in his grandmother’s backyard while they were responding to a 911 call about someone breaking windows. 

Officers Jared Robinet and Terrence Mercadal fired 20 shots at Clark, 22, and hit him seven times. 

They later claimed he had a gun – but he was carrying a phone. 

Prosecutors declined to file charges.

Clark was killed by two Sacramento police officers in his grandmother’s backyard while they were responding to a 911 call about someone breaking windows

Clark was killed by two Sacramento police officers in his grandmother’s backyard while they were responding to a 911 call about someone breaking windows

Officers Jared Robinet

Terrence Mercadal

Officers Jared Robinet (left) and Terrence Mercadal (right) fired 20 shots at Clark, 22, and hit him seven times. They later claimed he had a gun – but he was carrying a phone. Prosecutors declined to file charges.

 

THE EXCEPTIONS: COPS WHO WERE JAILED 

Michael Slager 

Michael Slager, a former cop from North Charleston, South Carolina fatally shot Walter Scott, who was black, as he ran away from him in 2015 following a traffic stop for a broken brake light. 

The shocking video of the incident filmed by a passerby went viral.

Slager pleaded guilty to violating Scott’s civil rights and a federal judge jailed him for 20 years after ruling that he considered the case equivalent to murder.

In a recent interview Slager’s ex-wife revealed the IRS ordered them to pay back $300,000 they had received as a settlement from the federal government due to issues with the Southern States Police Benevolent Association, an advocacy group which worked with him. 

Michael Slager, a former cop from North Charleston, South Carolina fatally shot Walter Scott, who was Black, as he ran away from him in 2015 following a traffic stop for a broken brake light

Walter Scott

Michael Slager, a former cop from North Charleston, South Carolina fatally shot Walter Scott, who was black, as he ran away from him in 2015 following a traffic stop for a broken brake light

The shocking video of the incident filmed by a passerby went viral. Slager pleaded guilty to violating Scott's civil rights and a federal judge jailed him for 20 years after ruling that he considered the case equivalent to murder

The shocking video of the incident filmed by a passerby went viral. Slager pleaded guilty to violating Scott’s civil rights and a federal judge jailed him for 20 years after ruling that he considered the case equivalent to murder

Two years after the incident they divorced and the ex-wife moved to Colorado so their children could still see their father while he is in prison.

Slager is serving his sentence at FCI Englewood where he is rubbing shoulders with Jared Fogel, the former spokesman for Subway who was exposed as a pedophile. 

Until recently Slager’s other prison mates included Rod Blagojevich, who was convicted in 2011 for trying to sell the US Senate seat of president-elect Barack Obama and was freed earlier this year by Donald Trump.

Slager’s mother Karen told DailyMail.com: ‘He’s doing fine, I’m sorry this all happened, but I’m going to refrain from commenting.’

 

Amber Guyger

Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger was convicted of murdering her neighbor Botham Jean after mistakenly walking into his apartment.

Guyger, 31, had gotten off duty when she opened fire in September 2018 because she thought Jean was a burglar who was going to kill her.

In fact she had entered the wrong apartment – her home was one floor below.

Guyger was sentenced to 10 years in jail and during her sentencing Jean’s younger brother Brandt, 18, said he forgave her and hugged her in court.

Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger was convicted of murdering her neighbor Botham Jean after mistakenly walking into his apartment. Guyger was sentenced to 10 years in jail

Botham Jean

Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger was convicted of murdering her neighbor Botham Jean after mistakenly walking into his apartment. Guyger was sentenced to 10 years in jail

Guyger, 31, had gotten off duty when she opened fire in September 2018 because she thought Jean was a burglar who was going to kill her. In fact she had entered the wrong apartment - her home was one floor below

Guyger, 31, had gotten off duty when she opened fire in September 2018 because she thought Jean was a burglar who was going to kill her. In fact she had entered the wrong apartment – her home was one floor below

THE CASES CURRENTLY IN THE HEADLINES

Ahmaud Arbery

The 25-year-old black man was out jogging in February in Glynn County, Georgia, when he was confronted by two white men, father and son Gregory and Travis McMichael.

They have claimed they suspected Arbery was a burglar and that he attacked them.

Lawyers for Arbery’s family say he was unarmed and that he was innocent.

The 25-year-old black man was out jogging in February in Glynn County, Georgia, when he was confronted by two white men, father and son Gregory and Travis McMichael. A video of the confrontation shows Arbery struggling with one of the men then three shots ring out - an autopsy showed he was shot twice in the chest

The 25-year-old black man was out jogging in February in Glynn County, Georgia, when he was confronted by two white men, father and son Gregory and Travis McMichael. A video of the confrontation shows Arbery struggling with one of the men then three shots ring out – an autopsy showed he was shot twice in the chest

Gregory, 64, and Travis, 34, have been charged with murder and aggravated assault. William Bryan, a neighbor who filmed the incident, claimed in court that Travis said ‘f****** n*****’ after shooting Arbery. The case took so long to move forward because it is on its fourth prosecutor

Gregory, 64, and Travis, 34, have been charged with murder and aggravated assault. William Bryan, a neighbor who filmed the incident, claimed in court that Travis said ‘f****** n*****’ after shooting Arbery. The case took so long to move forward because it is on its fourth prosecutor

A video of the confrontation shows Arbery struggling with one of the men then three shots ring out – an autopsy showed he was shot twice in the chest.

Gregory, 64, and Travis, 34, have been charged with murder and aggravated assault.

William Bryan, a neighbor who filmed the incident, claimed in court that Travis said ‘f****** n*****’ after shooting Arbery.

The case took so long to move forward because it is on its fourth prosecutor.

Brunswick District Attorney Jackie Johnson was accused of not letting police arrest the McMichaels after the shooting – Gregory previously worked in her office.

Last week, the McMichaels were indicted by a grand jury on murder charges, alongside their neighbor who filmed the killing. 

George Floyd

The former doorman, 46, was killed in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 25 after being arrested for allegedly using a fake $20 bill.

White police officer Derek Chauvin put his knee on his neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds even though he repeatedly begged ‘I can’t breathe’ and called for his dead mother.

The sickening incident was captured on video and sparked weeks of angry protests and demands for police reform.

The former doorman, 46, was killed in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 25 after being arrested for allegedly using a fake $20 bill

White police officer Derek Chauvin put his knee on his neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds even though he repeatedly begged ‘I can’t breathe’ and called for his dead mother.

The former doorman, 46, was killed in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 25 after being arrested for allegedly using a fake $20 bill. White police officer Derek Chauvin put his knee on his neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds even though he repeatedly begged ‘I can’t breathe’ and called for his dead mother. Chauvin was charged with second degree murder and all four officers were fired

Three Minneapolis police officers were indicted on charges of aiding and abetting second degree murder.

Chauvin was charged with second degree murder and all four officers were fired.

Legal experts have said convictions are no sure thing because the standard for second degree murder is so high.

Rayshard Brooks

Brooks was killed on June 12 by an Atlanta police officer after a struggle during a field sobriety test in a Wendy’s restaurant parking lot where he had been sleeping in the drive thru line. 

Brooks, 27, grabbed one officer’s taser gun and ran away, turning and apparently firing back as he did so. 

Brooks was killed on June 12 by an Atlanta police officer after a struggle during a field sobriety test in a Wendy's restaurant parking lot where he had been sleeping in the drive thru line

Brooks was killed on June 12 by an Atlanta police officer after a struggle during a field sobriety test in a Wendy’s restaurant parking lot where he had been sleeping in the drive thru line

Officer Garrett Rolfe, was in pursuit and shot three times, hitting Brooks twice. 

According to prosecutors, Rolfe said: ‘I got him’ and kicked Brooks as he struggled for his life – then failed to give him timely first aid. Rolfe faces 11 charges including felony murder. 

Devin Brosnan, the other officer involved in the arrest, is accused of aggravated assault for standing on Brooks after he was shot.

Breonna Taylor

After three months and sustained pressure from Taylor’s family and the public, one of the officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s death has finally been fired

The city of Louisville, Kentucky last week fired Louisville Metro Police Det. Brett Hankison. 

The force’s chief Robert Schroeder told him in a letter: ‘I find your conduct a shock to the conscience’.

Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT, was shot dead when they broke down her door in an attempted drug sting and shot her eight times.

After three months and sustained pressure from Taylor’s family and the public, Louisville Metro Police Det. Brett Hankison was fired

Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT, was shot dead when they broke down her door in an attempted drug sting and shot her eight times. After three months and sustained pressure from Taylor’s family and the public, Louisville Metro Police Det. Brett Hankison was fired 

Chief Schroeder added that Hankisonn’s ‘actions displayed an extreme indifference to the value of human life’ when he ‘wantonly and blindly fired ten rounds’ into Taylor’s apartment.

Hankison and two others have been on administrative leave since Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT, was shot dead when they broke down her door during an attempted drug sting in March.

Taylor’s family have filed a wrongful death lawsuit but Hankison’s lawyer has filed an appeal arguing he was fired prematurely and ‘should not be punished unless the facts show he committed wrongdoing, and the facts are not yet in’. 

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