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Britain is set to be hotter than Portugal next week as Indian Summer sees temperatures hit 81F 

After putting up with damp and chilly weather, Britain is set to enjoy an Indian summer next week, with temperatures set to hit the 80s.

By Monday, parts of the South could be warmer than the Portuguese capital, Lisbon, amid widespread sunshine across England and Wales.

A maximum temperature of 81F (27C) is expected in London that day, while many areas of southern England and East Anglia could reach 77F (25C).

Further north, the warmest places are set to reach 72F (22C). Lisbon is only set to reach 73F (23C). The warm conditions are expected to last through next week.

The rising mercury will hit by the weekend as large groups are allowed to gather for the last time before tougher restrictions are brought in, with just six people allowed to socialise together from Monday.

After putting up with damp and chilly weather, Britain is set to enjoy an Indian summer next week, with temperatures set to hit the 80s. Pictured: Beachgoers in Bournemouth on Tuesday

After putting up with damp and chilly weather, Britain is set to enjoy an Indian summer next week, with temperatures set to hit the 80s. Pictured: Beachgoers in Bournemouth on Tuesday

Temperatures are set to be higher than Lisbon, Portugal next week as the mercury rises to 81F in London by Monday

Temperatures are set to be higher than Lisbon, Portugal next week as the mercury rises to 81F in London by Monday

A man jumps from the jetty into the sea in Brighton, on the south coast of England, amid an earlier heatwave on August 7

A man jumps from the jetty into the sea in Brighton, on the south coast of England, amid an earlier heatwave on August 7

Brighton beach was packed earlier this summer as the South of England basked in a glorious heatwave on August 8

Brighton beach was packed earlier this summer as the South of England basked in a glorious heatwave on August 8

In its forecast, the Met Office said: ‘The period is likely to bring change to the weather seen in recent weeks.

‘This settled weather looks set to bring temperatures to near normal levels for most, for the time of year, but the South could see warm or very warm temperature at times.’

Amid clear skies and light winds, widespread mist and fog is due to develop at night, however particularly in rural areas, forecasters say.

The Met Office adds that there could also be some thunder – particularly for South West England – after several days of prolonged warm weather.

Forecasters say they do not yet know how long the warm spell will last or when it will break down.

But they predict a return to the usual pattern of sunshine mixed with spells of autumnal wet and windy weather before the end of the month.

The Indian summer is due to develop after a mostly dry but cool few days, with chilly nights.








A man sunbathes on the beach in Bournemouth, Dorset, on Tuesday as Britain's warm weather looks set to return

A man sunbathes on the beach in Bournemouth, Dorset, on Tuesday as Britain’s warm weather looks set to return

A maximum temperature of 81F (27C) is expected in London on Monday, while many areas of southern England and East Anglia could reach 77F (25C). Pictured: Bournemouth on August 7

A maximum temperature of 81F (27C) is expected in London on Monday, while many areas of southern England and East Anglia could reach 77F (25C). Pictured: Bournemouth on August 7

Pictured: A couple relax in the sunshine in the fountains at Trafalgar Square in London amid an earlier heatwave in August

Pictured: A couple relax in the sunshine in the fountains at Trafalgar Square in London amid an earlier heatwave in August

Today is set to be mostly dry with some sunny spells, while there will be some cloud and showers around tomorrow – especially in the afternoon and in north-western parts in particular.

But temperatures from today until Saturday are only due to reach maximum figures of 68F (20C) in the South and a chilly 63F (17C) further north.

The warmer weather is due to build from Sunday, when 77F (25C) is likely in South East England. The very warm spell due to arrive in the country over the next week is unlikely to break records, however.

The UK September temperature record dates back more than a century to 1906, when 96.08F (35.6C) was recorded at Hesley Hall, near Bawtry, South Yorkshire.

The warmest September day of recent years was September 13, 2016, when 93.9F (34.4C) was recorded at Gravesend, Kent – the warmest day of that year.

It comes after a mixed few weeks. There was a record-breaking heatwave in the first half of August when temperatures reached at least 93F (34C) for six consecutive days, while the second half of the month brought named storms Ellen and Francis, and one of the coldest August bank holiday weekends ever.

But Britons are set to make the most of the weekend’s weather, with it being the last time large groups will be allowed to socialise.

Boris Johnson yesterday insisted the draconian new coronavirus restrictions are essential to ‘keep our economy going and schools open’.

The PM told the House of Commons that the spike in infections seen over the past week left him no choice but to act.

And he warned the ‘rule of six’ on how many people can socialise will become ‘familiar to the country’, signalling the situation is unlikely to ease any time soon.

In a major setback for his ambition to get back to normal by Christmas, Mr Johnson has announced the first tightening of national lockdown since March.

From Monday it will be illegal to assemble in groups of seven or more anywhere in England, whether indoors or out.

The limit sparked by concerned that partying young people are fuelling a flare-up – is a dramatic reduction on the maximum of 30 put in place on July 4.

It will be enforced by police with £100 fines, doubling on each repeat offence up to £3,200. Only schools, workplaces and a limited number of other locations will be exempt.

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