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Britain records more coronavirus deaths

England has reported four more Covid-19 deaths taking the total to 41,555, while Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland have each reported zero.

The Department of Health are yet to confirm the early count, which is calculated by adding the deaths reported by each home nation.

NHS England was the only agency to have reported deaths today – four in hospitals, all on September 5. But these may not be included in the Government’s tally later due to differences in cut-off points.  

New Covid-19 cases will also be revealed this afternoon, after a ‘concerning’ 3,000 new cases reported on Sunday.

Bolton, Leeds, Birmingham and Manchester have reported significant hikes in cases in the past week, with infection rates reaching levels seen during April, May and June.

The Health Secretary said today the coronavirus ‘is not out of control’ in Britain amid scientists’ warnings the Government has lost its grip on spread of the disease. 

But he pleaded with young people specifically to adhere to social distancing and think of their grandparents because cases are being driven by under 25s in ‘affluent areas’.

Downing Street warned the ‘concerning’ number of cases would generally be expected to lead to a rise across the population as a whole.

Today Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said it is ‘dangerous’ to think ‘we no longer need to worry’ and the current restrictions are an ‘overreaction’. 

She also said there is a ‘warning’ in the rise in Covid-19 hospital admissions in Scotland – a possible indication cases are spreading to vulnerable people.

It comes as swathes of Britons headed back to work today with traffic and public transport returning to pre-Covid levels. 

The UK recorded its highest number of daily Covid-19 cases since May on Sunday. Some 2,988 were reported in just 24 hours

The UK recorded its highest number of daily Covid-19 cases since May on Sunday. Some 2,988 were reported in just 24 hours

In other coronavirus developments;

  • More than a hundred NHS Trusts may be overwhelmed this winter if the coronavirus hospitalisation rate surges to the level seen in April, an analysis has revealed;
  • Oxford University’s coronavirus vaccine will most likely be rolled out in the ‘first few months’ of next year, according to the Health Secretary Matt Hancock;
  • A second wave of coronavirus may not hit the UK until spring 2021 with a cold winter likely to impose its own ‘mini-quarantine’, a scientist has said.

COVID-19 VACCINE MOST LIKELY IN THE ‘FIRST FEW MONTHS’ OF 2021, SAYS HANCOCK

Oxford University’s coronavirus vaccine will most likely be rolled out in the ‘first few months’ of next year, according to the Health Secretary Matt Hancock.

The jab was expected at the end of 2020 but its creators have tempered expectations and pushed it back to next year.

Mr Hancock said today he still had some optimism the most vulnerable people will get their hands on the vaccine in the coming months in a ‘best-case scenario’.

But he admitted the more likely outcome would be a 2021 roll out of the jab, known as AZD1222, which was created by Oxford and owned by UK drug giant AstraZeneca.

The Health Secretary revealed manufacturing was already underway in the UK for 30million doses, enough to vaccinate half the population.

He said that having them on standby meant they could be dished out to those most in need as soon as the vaccine is given the green light by regulators. 

Yesterday the UK recorded its highest number of daily Covid-19 cases since May after 2,988 were reported in just 24 hours.

The last time the UK’s caseload was this high was May 23 – 15 weeks ago – when 2,959 people tested positive. 

Bolton, a town in Greater Manchester, has the highest number of cases in England, with 333 new diagnoses recorded in the seven days to September 3. 

It’s the equivalent of 115.8 cases per 100,000 people – up sharply from 36.5 in the previous week and the highest rate of new cases Bolton has recorded to date.

Rossendale, a Lancashire borough, is also seeing infection rates equivalent to May. 

It has the second highest rate in England, with some 52 new cases were recorded in the seven days to September 3 – the equivalent of 72.7 per 100,000 people, up from 19.6 in the previous week.

Leeds (41.6 cases per 100,000) and South Tyneside (68) are both seeing infection rates level with mid-May, while Manchester (50.1) and Birmingham (49.3) are at late-April figures.

The escalating Covid-19 cases in the UK follows the same trends in France and Spain, and the releasing of several lockdown restrictions.  

Speaking on LBC radio this morning, Mr Hancock said: ‘This rise in case we have seen in the last few days is concerning, and it’s concerning because we have seen a rise in cases in France, Spain and some other countries in Europe.

‘Nobody wants to see a second wave here. It just reinforces the point that people must follow the social distancing rules, they are so important.’ 

Asked by presenter Nick Ferrari if the UK had ‘lost control’, as suggested by some experts, Mr Hancock said: ‘No, but the whole country needs to follow social distancing.’

Mr Hancock said the most important point to get across was that the uptick in cases in the past few days have been in younger people under 25, ‘especially 17 to 21 year olds’. 

Nicola Sturgeon said today it is ‘dangerous’ to think ‘we no longer need to worry’ and the current restrictions are an ‘overreaction’.

The surge in cases has not been clearly evident in hospitalisations or deaths in the UK so far, further evidence the coronavirus is mostly affecting the younger generations. 

But Ms Sturgeon said there is a ‘warning’ in the rise in Covid-19 hospital admissions, which had risen to 22 in the week ending August 31, up from 14 in each of the previous two weeks.








In the last three weeks, half of all hospital admissions have been in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde Health Board area, which is currently under stricter Covid-19 measures.  

She said: ‘If transmission takes hold again, even if it starts in the younger, healthier, part of the population, which it appears to be doing, because younger people are interacting more, it won’t necessarily stay in that part of the population.

WINTER WAVE COULD ‘OVERWHELM 87% OF NHS HOSPITALS’ 

More than a hundred NHS Trusts may be overwhelmed this winter if the coronavirus hospitalisation rate surges to the level seen in April, an analysis has revealed.

A comparison of the average number of beds needed between December 2019 and February 2020, and the number of beds required for Covid-19 patients in April, at the peak of the pandemic, showed the startling figures.

It revealed that out of the 132 surveyed using data published by the NHS, 115 would be over-capacity should demand rise It showed 115 of the 132 studied would be over-capacity should there be a surge in hospitalisations.

Four of the five NHS trusts that could set to suffer the biggest shortage of beds are in the capital, with one, Walsall Healthcare, based near Birmingham.

The analysis comes as a leaked NHS document warns coronavirus hospital admissions could surge to five times the level seen in April without additional measures to control the virus – potentially overwhelming the health service.

Accidentally published online by a health board in Kent, the paper suggested that even stricter social distancing rules might not be able to contain hospital admissions.

The UK recorded the largest rise in coronavirus infections in 15 weeks yesterday, as 2,988 new cases were reported in just 24 hours.

‘It will eventually seep into older and more vulnerable groups. To be blunt, some young people will go on to infect their older friends or relatives.

‘And it is at that point we could see again more deaths and serious illnesses happen.’   

The First Minister said ‘we risk in the weeks ahead going back to a mounting toll of illness and death’ if action to combat coronavirus is to stop, and that the Scottish Government may need to ‘put the brakes’ on easing lockdown after a rise in Covid-19 cases.

The death toll in Scotland remains at 2,496 people, but a total of 146 people have tested positive for coronavirus in Scotland in the last 24 hours. This followed 208 positive cases on Sunday and brings the total to 21,543 cases.   

Over the last week, an average of 152 cases have been reported each day, Ms Sturgeon said, up from 14 per day six weeks ago. 

The proportion of people testing positive for the virus has also risen from under one per cent two weeks ago to 2.4 per cent now. 

It doesn’t bode well for Ms Sturgeon’s review of the lockdown measures in Scotland, the results of which are announced Thursday.

She said the country can only move from phase three to phase four of lockdown if the virus is no longer considered a significant threat.

Though she said no final decision has been made, she added it ‘may be that we have to put the brakes on some further changes, too’. 

‘From all of the latest statistics it is clear that will not be the case,’ she said, adding she didn’t want to ‘scaremonger’, but that there was a ‘definite trend’ that has to be taken seriously. 

Cases have also risen in Wales, by 133 today, a significant rise compared to the 28 cases reported a fortnight ago, on August 24.

Dr Giri Shankar, of Public Health Wales, said: ‘We are concerned about the significant rise in positive coronavirus cases in the Caerphilly area in recent days.

‘It is absolutely vital that everyone in the community abides by social distancing measures – that is, by self-isolating when asked to do so, keeping 2m away from others outside your household, and washing hands regularly.’

Dr Shankar appealed to everyone in the Caerphilly area to use the local testing unit at the leisure centre in the town if they had ‘even the mildest’ of Covid-19 symptoms or were feeling unwell ‘with no explanation’.

He urged parents not to withdraw children from schools unless asked to do so by the school or local authority.

‘We are now seeing a steady increase in cases in a number of communities across Wales and our investigations show that many of these have been transmitted due to a lack of social distancing,’ Dr Shankar added.

Scientists have previously said cases have risen over August as a result of increased testing in hotspots. The more testing is done, the more cases are found.

But the data suggests more people are actually catching the coronavirus, and it’s not just due to more testing.

The number of people who receive a ‘positive’ result after getting tested has gone up by 50 per cent in six weeks – from 1.4 per cent in mid-July to 2.3 per cent now – proving the prevalence is on an upward trend.

However on a positive note, a larger proportion of cases are being detected now compared to March and April – when testing was just limited to hospitals and the very sick and millions went untested.

A daily 3,000 cases is less of a concern now compared to the height of the pandemic, when it was clear diagnosed cases were only the tip of the iceberg.

Labour has called on Health Secretary Matt Hancock to explain the recent rise in coronavirus cases which they related to testing chaos.

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