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Coronavirus: Scientist says ‘pox parties’ may build immunity

Chickenpox parties may become the norm for Covid-19 to stop children catching the disease when they are older - and suffering worse effects (stock)

Chickenpox parties may become the norm for Covid-19 to stop children catching the disease when they are older – and suffering worse effects (stock)

Scientists speaking at a briefing said the disease spreads so well because it can make someone infectious 24 hours before they develop symptoms. This slide shows the virus progression from entry, to when the person becomes infectious, and then at seven to 11 days whether or not they need hospitalisation
Scientists speaking at a briefing said the disease spreads so well because it can make someone infectious 24 hours before they develop symptoms. This slide shows the virus progression from entry, to when the person becomes infectious, and then at seven to 11 days whether or not they need hospitalisation

The delayed body response to the virus is a 'brilliant' evolutionary tactic, said Professor Paul Lehner from Cambridge University, because it means people head to the races and pub while they are infectious - spreading the virus further
The delayed body response to the virus is a ‘brilliant’ evolutionary tactic, said Professor Paul Lehner from Cambridge University, because it means people head to the races and pub while they are infectious – spreading the virus further

What is a chickenpox party? 
Studies on patients who died from the virus in Trieste, Italy, have revealed large sections of their lungs were replaced with fibrous tissue (shown). This may cause 'long Covid'
Studies on patients who died from the virus in Trieste, Italy, have revealed large sections of their lungs were replaced with fibrous tissue (shown). This may cause ‘long Covid’

Infection with the virus can also cause cells to clump together. Pictured left are the cells in a healthy lung with red the cell wall and white the nucleus; and right are the cells during an infection where they have clearly clumped together
Infection with the virus can also cause cells to clump together. Pictured left are the cells in a healthy lung with red the cell wall and white the nucleus; and right are the cells during an infection where they have clearly clumped together

Vaccine ‘may be less effective’ for older people, scientist warns
Studies on patients in Trieste also revealed extensive blood clotting in the lungs of patients who had succumbed to the disease
Studies on patients in Trieste also revealed extensive blood clotting in the lungs of patients who had succumbed to the disease

Above are cells that are abnormally fused due to infection with the virus
Above are cells that are abnormally fused due to infection with the virus

Written by Daily Mail

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