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Daniel Andrews is targeted with anti-Semitic graffiti 

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews has been targeted with anti-Semitic graffiti over his strict coronavirus lockdown laws. 

Shocked residents discovered the graffiti spray-painted on a road in the eastern Melbourne suburb of Donvale on Tuesday morning.

‘Stop Dan Andrews,’ the graffiti read, but the ‘a’ had been replaced with a Star of David and a Swastika had replaced the final ‘s’.

The vile message comes just days after Melbourne’s lockdown was extended for a further two weeks in a bid to slow the spread of the deadly disease.

Shocked residents discovered the graffiti spray-painted on a road in the eastern Melbourne suburb of Donvale on Tuesday morning

Shocked residents discovered the graffiti spray-painted on a road in the eastern Melbourne suburb of Donvale on Tuesday morning

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews has been targeted with anti-Semitic graffiti over his strict coronavirus lockdown laws

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews has been targeted with anti-Semitic graffiti over his strict coronavirus lockdown laws

Australian Financial Review columnist James Thomson shared a picture of the graffiti on Twitter, he wrote: ‘Disgusted to see this on a road in Donvale in Melbourne’s east this morning. 

‘Appreciate feelings are running high about the lockdown, but this vile garbage is plain wrong.’

ABC journalist Dan Ziffer said the graffiti is ‘beyond stupid’.

‘If people want to better understand fascism they’d do well to visit the Holocaust Centre in Elsternwick when it re-opens,’ he wrote on Twitter.

‘People living under the boot don’t get takeaway coffee and strolls in the park.’

Two friends enjoy each others company by the beach in the sun during COVID-19 in Melbourne, Australia

Two friends enjoy each others company by the beach in the sun during COVID-19 in Melbourne, Australia

Locals enjoy the warmer spring Melbourne weather despite the wind during COVID-19 in Melbourne, Australia

Locals enjoy the warmer spring Melbourne weather despite the wind during COVID-19 in Melbourne, Australia

There has also been images of Mr Andrews and chief health officer Brett Sutton depicted as Nazi officers circulating on social media. 

Dr Dvir Abramovich, chairman of civil rights organisation the Anti-Defamation Commission, said using these evil symbols to attack Mr Andrews was an insult to the memory of victims murdered at the hands of the Nazis.

‘It is also a kick in the guts of every Holocaust survivor. We trust that those who carried out this outrageous act are identified and are brought to justice. 

‘We call on all religious and political leaders to declare in one voice that such reprehensible conduct will never be tolerated in our nation.’

Melbourne's latest lockdown has seen extra jobloss with hundreds of businesses forced to close (Pictured: A Zara store in Melbourne)

Melbourne’s latest lockdown has seen extra jobloss with hundreds of businesses forced to close (Pictured: A Zara store in Melbourne)

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is excited about the jobs market bounceback being led by NSW. Pictured: coronavirus jobless queue in April outside Centrelink in Melbourne

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is excited about the jobs market bounceback being led by NSW. Pictured: coronavirus jobless queue in April outside Centrelink in Melbourne

Tensions have flared since Victoria was forced back into lockdown when cases spiked to record breaking figures. 

But the rules have sparked anger from frustrated residents who have been banned from leaving their homes from 5am to 8pm each night.

From August 2 Melbourne was placed under level four restrictions, which came with the police enforceable curfew.

Melburnians have only been able to leave their homes between these hours for work, care-giving, medical reasons or on compassionate grounds. 

A police checkpoint at Albury on the NSW-Victorian border on July 8. It was the first time in 100 years the border was shut. Australia is split between those who want the suppression strategy blaming border closures for economic hardship and those who want elimination

A police checkpoint at Albury on the NSW-Victorian border on July 8. It was the first time in 100 years the border was shut. Australia is split between those who want the suppression strategy blaming border closures for economic hardship and those who want elimination

The rest of the state was placed under level three restrictions, which saw all cafes and restaurants close for dine-in service. The venues can offer takeaway and food delivery only. 

There was more fury when Mr Andrews unveiled his long-awaited four-step roadmap on Sunday, revealing Melbourne will continue under strict curfew and lockdown until the end of September. 

Moving between the stages of the roadmap relies on new infections dropping to five or fewer in one major step, and no new cases for two weeks for the final phase. 

Mr Andrews has been slammed for having an ‘unrealistic’ target to end lockdown. 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison slammed the state’s plan and argued the same standards would put Sydney under curfew. 

Victoria reported 55 new coronavirus cases and eight deaths on Tuesday. Pictured: A delivery driver is seen on Bourke Street in Melbourne on Sunday

Victoria reported 55 new coronavirus cases and eight deaths on Tuesday. Pictured: A delivery driver is seen on Bourke Street in Melbourne on Sunday

Pictured: Two Melburnians sit on the sand and enjoy the sun at St Kilda Beach on Sunday

Pictured: Two Melburnians sit on the sand and enjoy the sun at St Kilda Beach on Sunday

‘The plan that was outlined yesterday, I hope, is a worst-case scenario,’ he said on Monday.

‘Under the thresholds that have been set in that plan, Sydney would be under curfew now.’

But Mr Andrews dismissed the comparisons, noting NSW had not experienced the same level of community transmission as Victoria.

‘That’s not a point of pride, that’s just a fact,’ he said.

‘I’ve seen this commentary that under our settings, they’d be in lockdown – no they wouldn’t, because they’ve not had the community transmission that we’ve had.

‘We are different.’ 

MELBOURNE’S ROADMAP OUT OF COVID-19 LOCKDOWN – WHAT YOU WILL BE ABLE TO DO AND WHEN:

Step one: The first step will come in to place on September 13.

Step two: The second step will be implemented when Melbourne has 30-50 COVID-19 cases a day on average over the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on September 28. 

Step three: The move to step three will occur when there is a daily statewide average of five new cases over the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on October 26.

Step four: The move to step four will come when there have been no new COVID-19 cases in the past 14 days. The aim is for this to come into place on November 23.

COVID Normal: After 28 days of no new COVID-19 cases, things will return to normal. 

Step one – 11.59pm on September 13:

Curfew will be eased to 9pm-5am

People can still only leave home for the four reasons (shopping, exercise, work and care or medical attention)

Public gatherings increased to two people, or a household, for a maximum of two hours

 Singles can have one nominated person to their home as part of the ‘singles social bubble’ 

Childcare and early educators to remain closed

Schools will continue to learn remotely unless they have exemptions

 Adult education to continue to be done remotely, unless they have exemption

 Only go to work if you are in a permitted industry 

– Cafes and restaurants will continue with take away only

– Retail businesses will remain open for essential shopping, with others only operating with click and collect

– Only one person per household can do the essential shopping 

Step two – September 28:

Public gatherings increase again to five people from a maximum of two households

Childcare and early educators can re-open

Schools to continue with remote learning, but Prep to Grade Two and Year 11 and Year 12 students will gradually return to class in Term 4 

 There will be an increase to permitted workplaces

Step three – October 26:

Curfew is no longer in place

There are no restrictions on leaving home

Public gatherings increase to 10 people together outdoors

 A ‘household bubble’ will be introduced, so five people from one house can visit another 

Remote learning to continue, but Grades 3 to Year 11 can gradually return to class

– Adult education to continue to be done remotely, but hands on classes will see a phased return to onsite 

 Work from home is encouraged

– Up to 10 people can eat together at restaurants and cafes, with the majority of tables outdoor

– Retail shops to reopen, with hairdresses operating under safety measures but beauty stores to remain closed

– Real estate agents can conduct private inspections by appointment

– The one person per household limit on shopping is to be revoked 

Step four – November 23:

Public gatherings to increase to 50 people outdoors

 Up to 20 visitors can attend a home at any one time

 All adult education will return to onsite with safety measures in place

– Groups limited to 20 indoors and a maximum of 50 patrons per venue

– All retail stores to reopen, while real estate agents can operate with safety measures and by keeping a record of attendants

Step five – COVID normal:

Public gatherings have no restriction

 There will also be no restriction on visitors to homes

– Phased return to onsite work for work from home workers

  Schools to reopen as normal

– Restrictions on hospitality removed, but venues to continue keeping records 

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