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Dodo, 'Italian hand' and ninja: Get a first look at the new emojis set for iOS later this year 

In honor of World Emoji Day, Emojipedia has released the first official look at a number of the pictographs set to hit this year.

The gallery includes the extinct dodo bird, ninja with a sword and the highly anticipated ‘Italian hand’ or pinched fingers.

The ‘version 13.0’ list is set to also have n nesting dolls, piñata, tamale, boomerang, coin, anatomical heart, beaver, transgender symbol, bubble tea and lungs.

There are others that have been approved but have not been previewed yet, such as a smiling face with tear, disguised face and people hugging.

The gallery includes the extinct dodo bird, ninja with a sword and the highly anticipated 'Italian hand' or pinched fingers. The 'version 13.0' list is set to also have n nesting dolls, piñata, tamale, boomerang, coin, anatomical heart, beaver, transgender symbol, bubble tea and lungs

The gallery includes the extinct dodo bird, ninja with a sword and the highly anticipated ‘Italian hand’ or pinched fingers. The ‘version 13.0’ list is set to also have n nesting dolls, piñata, tamale, boomerang, coin, anatomical heart, beaver, transgender symbol, bubble tea and lungs

World Emoji Day is an unofficial holiday celebrated every July 17 since starting in 2014 and Apple has used the day to announce upcoming emojis for iOS.

One of the most discussed emojis of the year has been the so-called ‘Italian Hand,’ which is actually the pinched hand.

According to Emojipedia, it is described as ‘an emoji showing all fingers and thumb held together in a vertical orientation, sometimes referred to as the Italian hand gesture ‘ma che vuoi.’

Also included for the first time is a transgender symbol, which is ‘male with stroke and male and female sign, which will be accompanied with a transgender flag.

One of the most discussed emojis of the year has been the so-called ‘Italian Hand,’ which is actually the pinched hand

One of the most discussed emojis of the year has been the so-called ‘Italian Hand,’ which is actually the pinched hand

Jeff Ingold, head of media engagement at LGBT campaigns group Stonewall, said: ‘Taking action to make tools of communication, like emojis, more inclusive and diverse is always a welcome step.

‘So we’re glad to see the inclusion of more gender-neutral emojis and a trans flag emoji.’

‘Visibility is really important and companies can always be thinking of more ways to promote trans equality.’

The transgender flag consists of two horizontal lines, representing those born as a boy, two pink lines for those born as girls and a white line for those transitioning or without a gender, according to its designer, trans activist Monica Helms.

Also included for the first time is a transgender symbol, which is ‘male with stroke and male and female sign, which will be accompanied with a transgender flag

Also included for the first time is a transgender symbol, which is ‘male with stroke and male and female sign, which will be accompanied with a transgender flag 

Apple has also updated its Memoji options to include various headwear and colored face masks amid the coronavirus pandemic

Apple has also updated its Memoji options to include various headwear and colored face masks amid the coronavirus pandemic

In January, a total of 117 new characters and images had been approved for the emoji library, as announced by Unicode Consortium.

However, today’s reveal shows the images as they will be displayed to iOS users.

Apple has also updated its Memoji options to include various headwear and colored face masks amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The new options will not be available until the firm’s next operating system, iOS 14 rolls out later this year.

The tech giant rolled out Memoji in 2018, allowing users to create their own personalized characters that can be used in text and Facetime.

Elite Daily reports that three are three new Memoji stickers: a blushing Memoji, a fist bump Memoji, and a hugging Memoji.

As for headwear, options include a durag, a tichel, a cyclist helmet, a nurse cap, or a swim cap.

Users will also have the option to add a customized face mask to their digital selves that can be either pleated or seamed – and 16 colors will be available.

ARE EMOJIS RUINING THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE? 

Emojis may be a fun form of communication but they are destroying the English language, a recent study by Google has revealed.

Smiley faces, love hearts, thumbs up and other cartoon icons – rather than words – are the preferred method of communication by teenagers, who are considered the worst offenders regarding the decline in grammar and punctuation.

More than a third of British adults believe emojis are the reason for the deterioration in proper language usage, according to the study commissioned by the Google-owned site YouTube.

Emoji were first used by Japanese mobile phone companies in the late 1990s to express an emotion, concept or message in a simple, graphic way. Now, Twitter feeds, text messages and Facebook posts are crammed with them

Emojis were first used by Japanese mobile phone companies in the late 1990s to express an emotion, concept or message in a simple, graphic way. Now, Twitter feeds, text messages and Facebook posts are crammed with them

Of the two thousand adults, aged 16 to 65, who were asked their views, 94 per cent reckoned English was in a state of decline, with 80 per cent citing youngsters as the worst offenders.

The most common errors made by Brits are spelling mistakes (21 per cent), followed closely by apostrophe placement (16 per cent) and the misuse of a comma (16 per cent).

More than half of British adults are not confident with their command of spelling and grammar, the study also found.

Furthermore, around three-quarters of adults rely on emoji to communicate, in addition to a dependence on predictive text and spell checking.

The use of emojis has seeped into our culture to such an extent that the Oxford Dictionary’s ‘Word of the Year’ in 2015 wasn’t actually a word at all – it was the Face With Tears emoji, which shows just how influential the little graphic images have become.

They were first used by Japanese mobile phone companies in the late 1990s to express an emotion, concept or message in a simple, graphic way.

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