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'Emergency services murdered my son': Mother of Manchester bombing victim blames them for his death

The mother of a Manchester Arena bombing victim who could have been saved if paramedics treated him earlier has accused the emergency services of murdering her son.

John Atkinson, 28, suffered serious leg and abdominal injuries but they were ‘survivable’, the public inquiry into the 2017 atrocity was told last week.

It heard just one paramedic entered the blast site in the first 40 minutes after suicide bomber Salman Abedi detonated his backpack device at the end of an Ariana Grande concert.

But it was almost an hour before Mr Atkinson was evacuated and by then it was too late.

Manchester Arena bombing victim John Atkinson, 28, suffered serious leg and abdominal injuries but they were ‘survivable’, a public inquiry was told last week

Manchester Arena bombing victim John Atkinson, 28, suffered serious leg and abdominal injuries but they were ‘survivable’, a public inquiry was told last week

The care worker, from Radcliffe, Greater Manchester, had lost too much blood and went into cardiac arrest before reaching hospital.

Abedi, 22, had acted with help from his brother Hashem, 23, who was jailed for at least 55 years last month.

Mr Atkinson’s mother Daryl Price, 55, yesterday said it was very difficult to learn that her son was probably the only one of the 22 people who died who could have been saved. 

The care assistant said: ‘Now, after everything has come out, I don’t believe the Abedi brothers actually murdered my son.

‘They were contributory – but I feel the emergency services murdered my son.’ 

His mother Daryl Price, 55, said it was very difficult to learn that her son was probably the only one of the 22 people who died who could have been saved. Pictured: Ms Price, centre, at her son John's funeral with stepfather Kevan (left) and sister Stacey (right)

His mother Daryl Price, 55, said it was very difficult to learn that her son was probably the only one of the 22 people who died who could have been saved. Pictured: Ms Price, centre, at her son John’s funeral with stepfather Kevan (left) and sister Stacey (right)

She has accused the emergency services of murdering her son as she said he received little treatment and they 'left him to die'.

She has accused the emergency services of murdering her son as she said he received little treatment and they ‘left him to die’. 

Mrs Price spoke out as she prepared to pay tribute to Mr Atkinson at the inquiry in Manchester. 

A series of commemorative hearings dedicated to victims are due to start today.

Last week Paul Greaney QC opened the inquiry by explaining that it would examine the emergency services’ response and the issue of ‘survivability’.

The inquiry heard in the aftermath of the bomb Mr Atkinson was able to speak and had a pulse for more than an hour. 

However, ambulance delays meant he was not seen by paramedics until he was dragged out on a makeshift stretcher – constructed from advertising hoardings and a metal barrier – 54 minutes after the blast.

Mr Atkinson was able to speak and had a pulse for more than an hour but ambulance delays meant he was not seen until 54 minutes after the blast. Pictured: Emergency services arrive at the scene of the explosion

Mr Atkinson was able to speak and had a pulse for more than an hour but ambulance delays meant he was not seen until 54 minutes after the blast. Pictured: Emergency services arrive at the scene of the explosion

Pictured: CCTV image of suicide bomber Salman Abedi at Victoria Station making his way to the Manchester Arena, on May 22, 2017, where he detonated his bomb

Pictured: CCTV image of suicide bomber Salman Abedi at Victoria Station making his way to the Manchester Arena, on May 22, 2017, where he detonated his bomb

Mrs Price said it appeared he received little treatment until he went into cardiac arrest 24 minutes later. 

She said: ‘I believe that he would still be here now had he been seen sooner. It’s like he was just put to one side and left to die. They moved him to the triage area and then he was left. He was left to bleed to death. He was totally forgotten about for 24 minutes and by the time they got back to him they had to do CPR [life-saving technique] because they left him to die.’

Mrs Price said she also blamed MI5, who knew Salman Abedi had travelled to Libya and visited extremists in jail, and the arena security team.

She insisted: ‘Whoever was involved that night – the emergency services, MI5, the arena staff, security, they’re all guilty of my son’s murder. All of them.’

Victoria Higgins, of legal firm Slater and Gordon, who represents Mrs Price and other victims’ families, said: ‘There are questions the families need answering that didn’t feature as part of the criminal investigation and so it is vitally important they are now addressed.’

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