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Bill Turnbull, 64, reveals meat-free diet and yoga are helping him tackle prostate cancer

Bill Turnbull has revealed a plant-based diet and yoga have helped him maintain a healthy lifestyle and tackle mood swings brought on by hormone therapy as he tackles prostate cancer.

The broadcaster, 64, who was diagnosed with the incurable disease in 2017, admitted that while he feels ‘absolutely fine most of the time’, his medication can leave him ‘howling like a baby’.

Media personality Bill said he decided to ditch meat and diary after researching about alternative treatments, and expressed his gratitude towards fellow sufferers for providing him with ‘great’ advice.

New life: Bill Turnbull has revealed a plant-based diet and yoga have helped him tackle mood swings brought on by hormone therapy as he tackles prostate cancer

New life: Bill Turnbull has revealed a plant-based diet and yoga have helped him tackle mood swings brought on by hormone therapy as he tackles prostate cancer

On his cancer battle, the former BBC host said: ‘Most of the time, I am absolutely fine, I get hot flushes, they pass. But occasionally, I can feel my mood dipping.

‘Now when we go down into a dip and I howl like a baby – well, like a grown man, which is much worse – I understand it is chemically induced and it will pass the next day. And it always does.’

The presenter revealed he’s also on Radium 223, which ‘was working very well for five months’, but is ‘now working sort of OK.’ 

Battle: The broadcaster, 64, was diagnosed with the incurable disease in 2017 (pictured in 2012)

Battle: The broadcaster, 64, was diagnosed with the incurable disease in 2017 (pictured in 2012)

'I can feel my mood dropping': admitted that while he feels 'absolutely fine most of the time', his medication can leave him 'howling like a baby'

‘I can feel my mood dropping’: admitted that while he feels ‘absolutely fine most of the time’, his medication can leave him ‘howling like a baby’

'I did a lot of research': Media personality Bill said he decided to ditch meat and diary after researching about alternative treatments

‘I did a lot of research’: Media personality Bill said he decided to ditch meat and diary after researching about alternative treatments

The radioactive prostate cancer drug hones in on tumours that have metastasised, or spread, to the bones and blasts them with alpha particles.

New research by Professor Declan Murphy from Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre has shown that an improved prostate cancer scan could save lives by detecting those at risk of recurrence. 

On embarking on a lifestyle change with a meat-free diet and meditation, Bill told The Mirror: ‘I did a lot of research and it comes up time and time again that a wholefood, plant-based diet is good for you. It gets overwhelming, but it is great to be part of that cancer family. You get a lot of support from other people.’   

WHAT IS PROSTATE CANCER? 

Prostate cancer is the growth of tumours in the prostate gland.

Only men have a prostate, which is a walnut-sized gland between the rectum and the penis which creates a fluid to be mixed with sperm to create semen. 

How many people does it kill? 

More than 11,800 men a year – or one every 45 minutes – are now killed by prostate cancer in Britain, compared with about 11,400 women dying of breast cancer.

It means prostate cancer is behind only lung and bowel in terms of how many people it kills in Britain. In the US, the disease kills 26,000 each year. 

How quickly does it develop? 

Prostate cancer usually develops slowly, so there may be no signs someone has it for many years, according to the NHS

If the cancer is at an early stage and not causing symptoms, a policy of ‘watchful waiting’ or ‘active surveillance’ may be adopted. 

Some patients can be cured if the disease is treated in the early stages.

But if it diagnosed at a later stage, when it has spread, then it becomes terminal and treatment revolves around relieving symptoms.

Thousands of men are put off seeking a diagnosis because of the known side effects from treatment, including erectile dysfunction.

Tests and treatment 

There is no national prostate screening programme as for years the tests have been too inaccurate.

Doctors struggle to distinguish between aggressive and less serious tumours, making it hard to decide on treatment.

Men over 50 are eligible for a ‘PSA’ blood test which gives doctors a rough idea of whether a patient is at risk.

But it is unreliable. Patients who get a positive result are usually given a biopsy which is also not foolproof. 

Scientists are unsure as to what causes prostate cancer, but age, obesity and a lack of exercise are known risks. 

Anyone with any concerns can speak to Prostate Cancer UK’s specialist nurses on 0800 074 8383 or visit prostatecanceruk.org.

According to the NHS, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK, and causes of the disease are largely unknown. 

Last month, Bill returned to TV with his former co-host Susanna Reid, as he stood in for Piers Morgan on Good Morning Britain.

The dynamic duo presenter BBC Breakfast together from 2006, before Susanna, 49, left the show in 2014, while Bill retired in 2016.  

Together again: Last month, Bill returned to TV with his former co-host Susanna Reid, as he stood in for Piers Morgan on Good Morning Britain

Together again: Last month, Bill returned to TV with his former co-host Susanna Reid, as he stood in for Piers Morgan on Good Morning Britain








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Written by Angle News

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