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Father-of-two was able to kick his heroin and ice habit overnight after three overdoses

A father-of-two has revealed how he was able to kick his heroin and ice addictions following a daring prison escape, three overdoses and countless stints in rehab.

Danny Shannon grew up in stable household with a loving mother in Cabramatta, in Sydney’s west, but after dabbling with marijuana and LSD at 14 his life ‘spiralled out of control’.  

Mr Shannon became hooked on heroin when he was 16, before eventually turning to ice and landing himself behind bars by the time he was 18 after a string of drug-related offences. 

‘I’ve gone from being a happy, good kid from a good background and once I started using drugs, I never stopped,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.  

When he was 25, Mr Shannon famously escaped from Sydney’s Silverwater prison and fled all the way to Perth along with fellow inmate Patrick Page.

Danny Shannon grew up in stable household with a loving mother in Cabramatta, in Sydney's west, but after dabbling with marijuana and LSD at 14 his life 'spiraled out of control'

Danny Shannon grew up in stable household with a loving mother in Cabramatta, in Sydney’s west, but after dabbling with marijuana and LSD at 14 his life ‘spiraled out of control’ 

Danny Shannon, 45, has revealed how he was able to kick his heroin and ice addictions following a daring prison escape, three overdoses and countless stints in rehab

Danny Shannon, 45, has revealed how he was able to kick his heroin and ice addictions following a daring prison escape, three overdoses and countless stints in rehab 

Mr Shannon said his jailbreak was spurred on by a large sum of money he had hidden on the outside, and his eagerness to see his girlfriend, who was pregnant with their son. 

‘I called her and I said “if you could see me tonight would it be okay?” It was like I wanted her permission [to escape],’ he said.

‘I had money stashed outside I was itching to get my hands on. So I managed to scale a four-metre high barbed-wire fence.’  

The pair used garbage bin handles and rags to scale a five metre barbed-wire fence – before swimming through a shark-infested river.   

‘By the time we got down to Parramatta River, the water police and POLAIR were onto us,’ Mr Shannon said.

‘It was like a miracle. I don’t know how the f**k we got away. I was climbing through mangroves and mud up to my neck for hours to get out of the river.’

Mr Shannon eventually arrived to his then-partner’s house and grabbed his stash of money before they both made their way to Western Australia.  

The father-of-two lasted six days on the run before police busted down his door at a hotel in Perth. 

‘I got pinched on Valentine’s Day with my partner when police raided our hotel room,’ he said.  

Mr Shannon became hooked on heroin when he was 16, before eventually turning to ice and landing himself behind bars by the time he was 18 after a string of drug-related offences

Mr Shannon became hooked on heroin when he was 16, before eventually turning to ice and landing himself behind bars by the time he was 18 after a string of drug-related offences

He spent the next decade or so in and out of jail and rehab, checking himself in at least 50 times.

But after years of failing to shake his addictions, Mr Shannon made the life-changing decision in 2009 to check himself into Glebe House.

‘That was a turning point in my entire life. I haven’t really come close to using drugs since that day,’ he said. 

‘I thought to myself that there’s been maybe 100 times where I’ve been in that same position when I’ve thrown it all away.

‘For some miracle reason I was brave and strong enough and made a different decision for the first time in my life, and I’ve never looked back.’    

Mr Shannon has now been clean for 11 years, and said he hopes his experiences can serve as a lesson to others. Pictured with his daughter, 3

Mr Shannon has now been clean for 11 years, and said he hopes his experiences can serve as a lesson to others. Pictured with his daughter, 3

While Mr Shannon (right) works every single day on his sobriety, he said he isn't 'triggered' by thoughts of turning back to drugs

While Mr Shannon (right) works every single day on his sobriety, he said he isn’t ‘triggered’ by thoughts of turning back to drugs

Mr Shannon, who is a father to a 19-year-old son and a three-year-old daughter, started his own virtual time capsule company Encapsulator 10 years ago to document his progress

Mr Shannon, who is a father to a 19-year-old son and a three-year-old daughter, started his own virtual time capsule company Encapsulator 10 years ago to document his progress

Mr Shannon has been working at Glebe House – a community to help men transition to a life free from addiction – for over 10 years now.

‘I now represent a symbol of hope for so many people going through exactly what I did for over a decade,’ he said.  

Mr Shannon has now been clean for 11 years, and said he hopes his experiences can serve as a lesson to others. 

While Mr Shannon works every single day on his sobriety, he said he isn’t ‘triggered’ by thoughts of turning back to drugs.

‘The thought of it makes me sick. I work really hard everyday on my recovery program, and have been doing it everyday for 11 years,’ he said. 

Mr Shannon has been working at Glebe House - a community to help men transition to a life free from addiction - for over 10 years now

Mr Shannon has been working at Glebe House – a community to help men transition to a life free from addiction – for over 10 years now

But after years of failing to shake his addictions, Mr Shannon made the life-changing decision in 2009 to check himself into Glebe House (pictured)

But after years of failing to shake his addictions, Mr Shannon made the life-changing decision in 2009 to check himself into Glebe House (pictured)  

‘It’s not a chore but I work my a*** off on maintaining my sobriety by giving back and giving a lot of service to other people.’ 

Mr Shannon, who is a father to a 19-year-old son and a three-year-old daughter, started his own virtual time capsule company 10 years ago to document his progress.

‘When I celebrated five years’ clean this idea popped into my head to record a message to my 10 year birthday of sobriety,’ he said. 

‘I realised it was such a unique, therapeutic and self-reflective practice. I discovered a real experience in creating a video message to my future self.’

Mr Shannon said his company Encapsulator records his client’s messages to their future selves.

‘You can choose any day in the future you want to lock your content until. When you record your video it disappears until the date you’ve selected,’ he said. 

‘I’m a nostalgic person, and it’s perfect for measuring growth.’ 

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