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Florida bobcat and baby alligator battle to the death in back yard

A baby alligator was caught on camera in a fight to the death with a bobcat in Florida.

The battle was recorded by Conner DeMonte in Port Charlotte on Monday in his back yard and he posted it on his TikTok page with the hashtag #onlyinflorida.

At the start of the footage, the bobcat swipes a paw at the little gator, which stands its ground on a patio.

The hatchling opens its jaws as menacingly as it can muster but the big cat continues its deadly assault.








The bobcat and baby alligator fight to the death in a back yard in Port Charlotte, Florida, on Monday

The bobcat and baby alligator fight to the death in a back yard in Port Charlotte, Florida, on Monday

In footage taken by Conner DeMonte, the little reptile opens its jaws in a show of defiance - but it is no match for the big cat which swipes at the gator with its paws

In footage taken by Conner DeMonte, the little reptile opens its jaws in a show of defiance – but it is no match for the big cat which swipes at the gator with its paws

After the skirmish moves from the patio to grass, the bobcat ulimately ends up victorious, clutching the dead alligator in its mouth

After the skirmish moves from the patio to grass, the bobcat ulimately ends up victorious, clutching the dead alligator in its mouth

Moments later, the duelling pair move their fight onto some grass – and for a second, it looks as though the reptile has scored a direct hit when the bobcat leaps into the air.

The tables are swiftly turned, as the cat sends the baby gator sky high. And then it’s all over. 

Proudly displaying its kill to camera, the bobcat clutches the dead alligator in its jaws and wanders off into woodland to feast. 

Conner said: ‘I was taking a break from the games to cut a mango when I noticed a bobcat. 

Conner, who provides commentary throughout the fight, says at the end: 'That was sweet. Thanks, that could have bit my dog. Bobcat doing me a favour'

Conner, who provides commentary throughout the fight, says at the end: ‘That was sweet. Thanks, that could have bit my dog. Bobcat doing me a favour’

‘After a minute of filming, a baby alligator came into frame and they went at it. Mother Nature at its finest.’ 

Throughout the skirmish, he also provides narration, beginning with, ‘Oh my God, there’s a baby alligator. What the f**k?’ 

He continues mid-battle with, ‘Holy sh*t. What’s happening right now? 

And after the fight reaches its predictable conclusion, Conner says: ‘That was sweet. Thanks, that could have bit my dog. Bobcat doing me a favour.’ 

Solitary and rarely seen: The Florida bobcat

The Florida bobcat (file image), a stealthy predator, is abundant in the state

The Florida bobcat (file image), a stealthy predator, is abundant in the state

The bobcat – also known as the Florida lynx or wildcat – is a solitary, stealthy animal that is rarely sighted.

It is one of two predatory big cats found in the state, along with the panther – and is the smaller of the two.

The Florida bobcat is not classed as threatened or endangered due to its abundant numbers (unlike the panther, which is endangered).

Bobcats are found all over the state, including swamps, forests, suburban backyards – and occasionally at the top of utility poles. 

Weighing between 9 and 33lb, the bobcat can reach speeds of about 30mph. 

Their diet consists mainly of rabbits, rodents, small deer, lizards and snakes. 

 

… and vulnerable baby alligators

Newly hatched alligators are about six to eight inches (15 to 20 centimeters) long, and extremely vulnerable. 

They are considered babies until they have reached six feet in length which can take up to two years. 

Although very small, they have a set of 60 to 80 very sharp teeth, so they can attempt to defend themselves when necessary.

Baby gators – classed as hatchlings since they are hatched from eggs – usually live with their mother for up to two years.

They also have poor metabolism which means they rest much of the time and don’t have much energy. 

Alligators are considered babies until they have reached six feet in length which can take up to two years. (File image)

Alligators are considered babies until they have reached six feet in length which can take up to two years. (File image)

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