in

Foodies are going wild for this $26 BIG MAC risotto on sale in Sydney's Estate restaurant

Foodies are going wild for a $26 Big Mac risotto from a restaurant in Sydney, complete with wagyu beef, sesame seeds and fermented cucumber pickles.

For two months, the delicious McDonald’s-inspired dish is being served up at Estate restaurant in Sydney’s Coogee by head chef Matthew Butcher.

Matthew is seeking to recreate the dish that was originally made famous by fellow chef and mentor Ryan Clift at Singapore’s Tippling Club.

Foodies are going wild for a $26 Big Mac risotto from a restaurant in Sydney, complete with wagyu beef, sesame seeds and fermented cucumber pickles (the dish pictured)

Foodies are going wild for a $26 Big Mac risotto from a restaurant in Sydney, complete with wagyu beef, sesame seeds and fermented cucumber pickles (the dish pictured)

For two months, the delicious McDonald's-inspired dish is being served up at Estate restaurant in Sydney's Coogee by head chef Matthew Butcher (stock image)

For two months, the delicious McDonald’s-inspired dish is being served up at Estate restaurant in Sydney’s Coogee by head chef Matthew Butcher (stock image)

‘The base tastes exactly like you’re eating a Big Mac and this comes from the secret sauce recipe that we use that we actually fluked making from the original Big Mac sauce recipe,’ Matthew told Good Food.

Poll

Would you try the Big Mac risotto?


Would you try the Big Mac risotto?

  • Yes 0 votes
  • No 0 votes

Now share your opinion

  •  

‘The risotto is then topped with wagyu beef and then a homemade cheese. Lettuce is stirred through the risotto, which provides crunch, and it’s topped with fermented cucumbers, dill and sesame seeds.’

The square of house-made cheese on the top of the burger is made from Parmesan, milk and kappa.

Matthew also said the secret to perfecting the risotto and making it as similar to the iconic Big Mac as possible is adding a specific type of mustard to the dish – which he wouldn’t name. 

Food lovers online who have spotted the unique dish are divided as to whether the idea is ‘brilliant’ or ‘a step too far’.

‘God, I want this,’ one person posted.

‘Okay, so this is a must try,’ another added.

While some said it looks like ‘vomit’, another person who has tried the dish said ‘I have been lucky enough to try this in your restaurant and still dream about it today’.  

Previously, a chef with millions of followers on social media revealed how to make McDonald's chips at home - and the secret lies in frying them twice (McDonald's fries pictured)

Previously, a chef with millions of followers on social media revealed how to make McDonald’s chips at home – and the secret lies in frying them twice (McDonald’s fries pictured)

Rob Nixon, from Perth, Western Australia, is the brains behind Nicko's Kitchen, which specialises in homemade versions of iconic fast food dishes (his chips pictured)

Rob Nixon, from Perth, Western Australia, is the brains behind Nicko’s Kitchen, which specialises in homemade versions of iconic fast food dishes (his chips pictured)

Previously, a chef with millions of followers on social media revealed how to make McDonald’s chips at home – and the secret lies in frying them twice. 

Rob Nixon, from Perth, Western Australia, is the brains behind Nicko’s Kitchen, an online cookery show broadcast on YouTube, Instagram and TikTok which specialises in homemade versions of iconic fast food dishes.

Mr Nixon showed viewers how to prepare a batch of ‘Maccas’ fries with three potatoes, water and corn syrup, before deep frying them in sizzling canola oil and seasoning with salt, so they never need to queue at the drive-thru again

What you need for DIY McDonald’s chips

Three large potatoes

Canola oil

Water

One tablespoon of corn syrup

Half a teaspoon of salt

Source: Nicko’s Kitchen

To start, cut the potatoes into thin strips using a mandolin with a chip slicer attached to the end, or with a sharp knife.

Fill a large bowl with cold water and submerge the chips to remove excess starch, leaving aside for 10 minutes.

Transfer the chips into a bowl of hot water mixed with a tablespoon of corn syrup.

Whisk the mixture so that the syrup dissolves, then leave the chips to soak for another 10 minutes.

The syrup will infuse a mild sweetness and encourage the chips to crisp golden brown when fried.

Once thoroughly soaked, place the chips on a towel and pat dry, then leave in the fridge for 30 minutes to dry.

Meanwhile, heat a generous amount of canola oil in a saucepan until sizzling hot, then fry chips twice in two batches for four minutes each.

‘The second fry is worth it for that authentic flavour and golden colour,’ Mr Nixon said.

Sprinkle a teaspoon of salt over the top and serve while the chips are still warm.  

Source link

Australian universities ranked on employment of graduates in Graduate Outcomes Survey 2020

Coronavirus US: Andrew Cuomo slams Washington Square Park party