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Foul-mouthed 'essential worker' fined by police for breaking COVID-19 restrictions to wash his car

A driver has let fly at police as they slapped him with a $1,652 fine for breaking coronavirus restrictions by washing his car in the dead of the night.

The man shared video footage showing him clash with two Victoria Police officers at a Melbourne car wash in the early hours of Wednesday morning.   

The male police officer said: ‘So as I said to you before, we’re speaking in relation to the new COVID-19 laws.

‘What’s your reason for being out at 1.15 in the morning washing your car?’








An 'essential worker' has been fined for washing his car at 1.15am. The man shared video footage of him clashing with two Victoria Police officers at a Melbourne car wash on Wednesday (pictured)

An ‘essential worker’ has been fined for washing his car at 1.15am. The man shared video footage of him clashing with two Victoria Police officers at a Melbourne car wash on Wednesday (pictured)

The man said he worked in ‘essential services’ and was unable to wash his car during the day.  

‘I’m working 12 to f***ing 14-hour days and I don’t get time to wash the b****rd. That’s my reason,’ he said.

‘I’m running fresh produce to the supermarkets which are feeding you. I work in an essential service.’

The police officer said he also held an essential job, but that he didn’t clean his car during the early hours of the morning.

Under Stage Three restrictions, Victorians are only allowed to leave the house for one of five reasons  – shopping for food, work and education, care reasons, exercise or other extenuating circumstances.  

The agitated ‘essential worker’ said he was a victim of ‘communist Australia’ and told the officers residents would not follow rules to stay home over the Easter holidays.

‘You think f***ing everyone is going to stay home at Easter and do nothing? C’mon,’ he said.

The male police officer said: 'So as I said to you before, we're speaking in relation to the new COVID-19 laws.' 'What's your reason for being out at 1.15 in the morning washing your car?'

The male police officer said: ‘So as I said to you before, we’re speaking in relation to the new COVID-19 laws.’ ‘What’s your reason for being out at 1.15 in the morning washing your car?’

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA: 6,105

New South Wales: 2,773

Victoria: 1,228

Queensland: 953 

South Australia: 421

Western Australia: 495

Australian Capital Territory: 100

Tasmania: 107

Northern Territory: 28

TOTAL CASES:  6,105

RECOVERED: 2,948

DEAD: 51

The man – who took his dog to the car wash with him – also accused the officers of breaking social distancing guidelines by stepping within two metres of his personal space. 

The verbal altercation ended when an officer told the man he would receive a ‘ticket in the mail’.

‘Go get a f***ing life mate,’ the man replied while getting into his car.  

A Victoria Police spokeswoman said they do not comment on individual fines. 

Police Minister Lisa Neville on Thursday morning said in the past 24 hours officers had conducted 1,065 spot checks and issued 78 on-the-spot fines. 

Victorians who fail to follow social-distancing rules can be fined $1,652, while businesses can be fined $9,913. 

The man - who took his dog to the car wash with him (pictured) - also accused the officers of breaking social distancing guidelines by stepping within two metres of his personal space

The man – who took his dog to the car wash with him (pictured) – also accused the officers of breaking social distancing guidelines by stepping within two metres of his personal space

SOCIAL DISTANCING LAWS EXPLAINED STATE-BY-STATE: HOW TO AVOID GETTING CAUGHT OUT

Queensland

Gatherings are restricted to two people, with residents only allowed out of their homes for a few essential reasons. 

This includes buying food or essential goods, getting a medical treatment or engaging in physical exercise. 

You can also visit a terminally ill relative or attend a funeral.

Students are also allowed to attend childcare, school, college or university.

From April 3, the state’s borders will be closed to everyone except residents and essential workers.

New South Wales

NSW officials are also enforcing the two-person limit, with residents legally obliged to stay at home unless they have a ‘reasonable excuse’. 

This includes travelling to work or school, buying food or other essentials, exercise and medical reasons.

It is left up to police officers to decide who will get the fines, with the maximum being an $11,000 fine or six months in prison.  

Victoria 

The state has also brought in the two-person limit inside and outside the home – not counting people you already live with.

Its chief medical officer Dr Brett Sutton confirmed an exception would made for people visiting their boyfriend or girlfriend if they lived separately. 

Otherwise, people are allowed to leave the house for one of five reasons – shopping for food, work and education, care reasons, exercise or other extenuating circumstances. 

Australian Capital Territory

The ACT is also enforcing the two-person limit, but people are allowed up to two guests inside their homes – only if there is at least four square metres per person.   

It also only allows people to leave home for essential reasons, including shopping for essentials, medical reasons, exercise, work or study.

Offenders are being issue with warnings, but may get a fine if they are found to be breaking the rules again.

Western Australia 

As well as closing its borders to non-residents, WA has also introduced fines for people who cross out of their region.

Nine regions have been carved up, and people cannot move between them for anything but an essential reason.

This includes going to work, medical appointments, school or other types of education.

Drivers are also allowed to transport freight, and people can go to a shop outside of their area if the essentials are not available closer to home.  

Northern Territory 

In NT, police are still enforcing a 10-person limit rather than just two people.

But chief minister Michael Gunner warned it may take further action if people don’t stick to the rules.

All non-essential arrivals in the state must self-quarantine for 14 days, and people are not allowed to visit remote communities.

Tasmania

Tasmania also has brought into law the two-person limit, with residents only allowed to leave home for essential reasons.

This includes shopping, exercising, and going to healthcare apppointments. 

Going to a vet is also allowed, as is going to school or caring for another person.  

Arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days. 

South Australia

SA has also stuck to the 10-person limit, with $1,000 on-the-spot fines for people who have a larger group.

Again, all arrivals into the state must self-isolate for 14 days. 

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Written by Angle News

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