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Horrifying moment mother catches a giant python napping in her child's bed

A Queensland mother was shocked to find a two-metre long python curled up in her young son’s bed on a cold rainy day. 

Stuart McKenzie, from Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers, was called to the Beerwah home on Monday after the reptile was discovered soaking up the heat of an electric blanket.  

Even the seasoned snake catcher was stunned when he caught sight of the ‘massive’ carpet python in the child’s bedroom. 

‘Holy dooley look at the size of it, just sitting on the bed,’ Mr McKenzie said.

‘It’s definitely not something you expect to see on your bed.’ 

A Queensland family were shocked when they discovered a two metre long carpet python taking up residence on their young son's bed (pictured)

A Queensland family were shocked when they discovered a two metre long carpet python taking up residence on their young son’s bed (pictured)








The parents sent a picture of the snake to their son who was excited and wanted to post it to his social media. 

It’s thought the snake made its way inside to escape heavy rain before sensing the electric blanket and making a beeline for the young boy’s bed. 

After uncurling the reptile Mr McKenzie said it was even bigger than the two metres he had estimated.  

He was able to successfully capture the animal and move it outside before warning viewers there are some ‘big snakes on the move at the moment’. 

Snake catcher Stuart McKenzie said the snake (pictured) was attracted to the bed because of an electric blanket which had been left on, warning snakes were currently on the move

Snake catcher Stuart McKenzie said the snake (pictured) was attracted to the bed because of an electric blanket which had been left on, warning snakes were currently on the move 

The start of spring has prompted calls for Australians to be on their guard as snakes move around and can become aggressive if looking for a mate or threatened.

The Australian Reptile Park’s head of venom, Billy Collett, said they don’t go out to hurt humans but if threatened they will attack, which can be fatal. 

‘All households should keep grass areas around houses low and well maintained, also avoid piling up left over wood from winter or accumulating stick piles,’ he said.

‘Tin sheets or any household items like these that are piled up, can draw in heat providing a perfect man made habitat for snakes.’ 

He said if one is startled while it’s lying in wait for prey than it will most likely lash out with a bite to defend itself. 

The Royal Flying Doctor Service said there are around 3,000 snake bites recorded in Australia each year with an average of two deaths. 

After uncurling the snake (pictured) Mr McKenzie said it was probably larger than the two metres he had originally estimated

After uncurling the snake (pictured) Mr McKenzie said it was probably larger than the two metres he had originally estimated

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