in

Images show how Australia's world-famous Circular Quay promenade is at 'serious risk' of collapsing

New images of Australia’s world-famous Circular Quay promenade have exposed concerning deterioration lurking beneath the surface. 

The southern part of the walkway, which features views of Sydney’s iconic Opera House and Harbour Bridge, is the most dilapidated, engineers claim. 

An internal report from August last year featured pictures of the wooden piles, the concrete underside of the walkway and the seawall beneath, revealing how they have fallen into disrepair.

The southern part of the walkway, which features views of Sydney's iconic Opera House and Harbour Bridge, is the most dilapidated, engineers claim

The southern part of the walkway, which features views of Sydney’s iconic Opera House and Harbour Bridge, is the most dilapidated, engineers claim 

Secret images of Australia's world-famous Circular Quay promenade have exposed concerning deterioration lurking beneath the surface (Pictured: A wooden pile beneath the eastern concourse last year)

Secret images of Australia’s world-famous Circular Quay promenade have exposed concerning deterioration lurking beneath the surface (Pictured: A wooden pile beneath the eastern concourse last year)

Engineers estimated that about a third of the southern promenade’s 234 timber and steel piles were in a poor condition, the report, which was obtained by the Sydney Morning Herald under freedom of information, showed.

Fears were raised that there was cause for concern  as it was ‘likely to worsen and may cause serious structural inadequacies in the future’.

Graeme Taylor, from community group Action for Public Transport, slammed the government for not doing enough to ensure the structures were safe. 

‘It’s really in a serious state of disrepair. A much more proactive approach is needed to more seriously address the widespread deterioration.’

Engineers estimated that about a third of the southern promenade's 234 timber and steel piles were in a poor condition (Pictured: Corrosion on steel beams beneath the Circular Quay promenade)

Engineers estimated that about a third of the southern promenade’s 234 timber and steel piles were in a poor condition (Pictured: Corrosion on steel beams beneath the Circular Quay promenade)

The government came under fire earlier this year when it was revealed Circular Quay's iconic wharves were also hiding concerning defects

The government came under fire earlier this year when it was revealed Circular Quay’s iconic wharves were also hiding concerning defects

A spokesman from NSW Transport said ‘all necessary critical maintenance has been, and will continue to be, carried out’.

Six of 16 concrete support structures and 45 piles have been repaired or replaced over the past few months. 

‘The community may be assured that Transport for NSW undertakes regular and comprehensive inspections and maintenance,’ he said.

The government came under fire earlier this year when it was revealed Circular Quay’s iconic wharves were also hiding concerning defects. 

The defects included broken chains, rotting timber and severely damaged supports, 9news reported. 

The wharves heritage-listed, which means upgrades are restricted to repair and replacement work with the same or similar materials. 

The government has planned to begin construction on both the aged Circular Quay ferry wharves and waterfront land in 2023 with the price sitting around $200 million.

The upgrade is much later than the original plans, which had the construction beginning last year. 

The government came under fire earlier this year when it was revealed Circular Quay's iconic wharves were also hiding concerning defects

The government came under fire earlier this year when it was revealed Circular Quay’s iconic wharves were also hiding concerning defects

The defects included broken chains, rotting timber and severely damaged supports. The wharves heritage-listed, which means upgrades are restricted to repair and replacement work with the same or similar material

The defects included broken chains, rotting timber and severely damaged supports. The wharves heritage-listed, which means upgrades are restricted to repair and replacement work with the same or similar material

Source link

Florida man is caught on camera punching his terrified dog because it ran out of his house

Inside the Japanese retreat at 28 Mackennal Street in Canberra