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Inside the new hippy commune promoted by Pete Evans where people pay to live off the grid

Disgraced celebrity chef Pete Evans is promoting a hippy commune being developed in northern NSW.  

The anti-vaxxer and 5G conspiracy theorist shared a video to his Instagram last week advertising the Nightcap on Minjungbal project at Mount Burrell near Nimbin.  

The venture is offering people the chance to buy into the 3500 acre block of land and then build their own ‘dwelling’. 

‘Exciting new adventure awaits for anyone wishing to create a new lifestyle for themselves and their family,’ Evans wrote. 








Pete Evans shared a video (pictured) to his Instagram promoting a hippy commune, Nightcap on Minjungbal, being established in northern NSW

Pete Evans shared a video (pictured) to his Instagram promoting a hippy commune, Nightcap on Minjungbal, being established in northern NSW

In the clip, developer Adrian Brennock said the commune will act as a ‘sanctuary’ to protect residents from disasters that can take place in the outside world. 

‘If we do get locked down or there are food shortages, or whatever disasters befall us in the future, we are in a position here to be completely self reliant,’ he said.  

Brennock touts the land as having unlimited natural resources, including water and sun for solar power. 

Investors’ funds will go towards a commercial development on the site, which will include businesses such as service stations and pubs that can generate income that will feed back into the community. 

Community centres, a ‘sacred geometry pub’, medical centre and healing hubs are also being designed to be erected on the grounds.   

Evans said he jumped on board the project after discovering the ethos was ‘do no harm’.  

Nightcap on Minjungbal (site pictured) is being developed at Mount Burrell near Nimbin

Nightcap on Minjungbal (site pictured) is being developed at Mount Burrell near Nimbin

Developer Adrian Brennock said the area has unlimited water and sunlight for solar power

Developer Adrian Brennock said the area has unlimited water and sunlight for solar power

People can  buy into the 3500 acre block of land then build their own dwelling. Pictured is a blue print for a potential cabin

People can  buy into the 3500 acre block of land then build their own dwelling. Pictured is a blue print for a potential cabin

‘This should be shouted to everybody – self-reliance, self-empowerment, connection to the earth, connection to spirit, connection to each other,’ Evans says.

‘There’s not much else to say but I’m f—-n in.’  

Residents wishing to participate will buy shares from the company who owns the block, and then will be allocated an ‘exclusive’ 2.5 acre allotment. 

To begin the process, members need to be ‘invited in’ to the project by the tribe and fellow community members, which includes some local indigenous leaders.

Applicants will then proceed through a series of interviews before they are accepted. It is unclear how much it will cost to buy in.

On its website, the Nightcap on Minjungbal writes the residents are expected to  ‘posses similar desires regarding lifestyle, environment and community’.

To join, members will need to be 'invited in' to the project (pictured) by the tribe and fellow community members

To join, members will need to be ‘invited in’ to the project (pictured) by the tribe and fellow community members

A map of the building site where prospective residents can buy shares into the company that owns the land in exchange for an exclusive lot

A map of the building site where prospective residents can buy shares into the company that owns the land in exchange for an exclusive lot

‘It is expected that a level of genuine “Community” feeling will exist between all of those who reside on the land, and taking an active part in ­Community exercises and meetings is an important part of the ­decision to invite you on to the block,’ it says.

‘There is no desire to ‘live in each other’s pockets’ or to be ‘communal free loving hippies’ by any means, but an active group mentality is vital for those times that it is required.’

 ‘We are very open to “alternative” style dwellings such as Earth-ships, Shipping Container Homes and so forth.’

The video has racked up more than 26,000 views, with a handful of fans expressing interest. 

‘Love you Pete! I’m f***n in too…just need to work on my husband,’ one woman wrote.

In the documentary, developers said there is ample wood from surrounding structures (pictured) that can be used for people to construct their own dwelling

In the documentary, developers said there is ample wood from surrounding structures (pictured) that can be used for people to construct their own dwelling

The website says: 'We are very open "alternative" style dwellings such as Earth-ships, Shipping Container Homes and so forth'. Pictured is an example of a cabin built by a designer who is working on the project

The website says: ‘We are very open “alternative” style dwellings such as Earth-ships, Shipping Container Homes and so forth’. Pictured is an example of a cabin built by a designer who is working on the project

Another added:’Exciting times looking forward to being part of the community. The sooner the better!’

‘How much does it cost?’ one man inquired.  

The shared-housing community is flagged to be built on the same site where a similar venture recently failed- leaving creditors and would-be residents owed more than $2.5million dollars. 

The Bhula Bhula Community Village, a colony where people paid up to $160,000 each to live off the grid in ‘earthships’ made from tyres, crumbled in 2017, leaving a trail of legal clashes in its wake.  

Each unit holder in the village, featuring an ‘amazing community centre’ and ‘much more’,  was promised three- to five-acres of private use land, in which they could ‘living harmoniously’ with ‘co-operative power’. 

However, no council development applications were lodged and Wollumbin ­Horizons Pty Ltd, the company behind the failed proposal, was placed into liquidation. 

The site was recently bought for $2million annd was previously home to a similar project that collapsed, owing would-be-residents and creditors $2.5million

The site was recently bought for $2million annd was previously home to a similar project that collapsed, owing would-be-residents and creditors $2.5million

The liquidator sold the property for $2 million to another entity understood to be linked to figures involved in the previous project, the Courier Mail reports.

Adrian ‘AB’ Brennock, who appeared alongside Evans in the video, is the former director of Wollumbin Horizons.

However, he said the Night Cap project was ‘unique’.

‘It is a paradigm changing investment for people who are looking to buy into a land development that ‘has never been done before,’ he said in the video.

The Bhula Bhula Community Village was first marketed by the Truthology movement in 2014, with development commencing the following year.  

The Tweed Shire Council launched  action against the Wollumbin Horizons in the NSW Land and Environment Court in 2016 after investigations into the community found unauthorised structures and changes to vegetation on the lot.  

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