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Inside the tiny home that started life as a World War II ammunition bunker in Queensland

A former underground ammunition bunker used during World War II has been turned into a cosy 12-metre-long house.

David and Julie Hinds purchased several old concrete-lined sheds at RAAF Kowguran in Miles, 337km north-west of Brisbane, in 1986.

The base had been abandoned for 30 years when the couple purchased the land and moved in to one of the sheds, converting it into their dream home.

They have since turned the area into holiday homes called Possum Park, where people can park their caravans or stay in one of the bunkers. 

‘I think I must have said, “wouldn’t it be good to live in here”, and the rest is history,’ Mrs Hinds told the ABC.

David and Julie Hinds purchased the property in 1986 and moved into one of the concrete bunkers (pictured, the cosy kitchen)

David and Julie Hinds purchased the property in 1986 and moved into one of the concrete bunkers (pictured, the cosy kitchen)

The bunkers, 337km north-west of Brisbane, (pictured) were used as an ammunition storage facility during World War II

The bunkers, 337km north-west of Brisbane, (pictured) were used as an ammunition storage facility during World War II

She explained that while the renovation has been an adventure, they were met with a spate of problems including minimal mobile phone reception and issues with securing plumbing. 

The couple had previously lived in a large farm house, meaning small cupboards and curved walls took some getting used to – and made it impossible to hang paintings.

Mr Hinds said the property was regarded as a secret base at the time.

‘The townspeople would not have known what exactly what was going on, although the servicemen probably talked about it, and word gets around a small town,’ he said. 

The couple said they have had several vistors who served on the base between 1946, when it was founded, and 1956.

The men who served on the base used to live in wooden barracks, which were cool in winter and warm in summer.

Mr Hinds said the concrete bunkers have the opposite effect.  

They have since turned the area into an accommodation called Possum Park, where people can park their caravans or stay in one of the bunkers (pictured)

They have since turned the area into an accommodation called Possum Park, where people can park their caravans or stay in one of the bunkers (pictured)

The couple said they have had visitors from people who served on the base between 1946, when it was founded, and 1956 (pictured, a double bedroom at the base)

The couple said they have had visitors from people who served on the base between 1946, when it was founded, and 1956 (pictured, a double bedroom at the base)

Many of the bunkers (pictured) had hay inside of them when Mr and Mrs Hinds first purchased the property

Many of the bunkers (pictured) had hay inside of them when Mr and Mrs Hinds first purchased the property

‘They complimented us saying “we should have thrown the bombs outside and lived inside the bunkers ourselves”,’ he said.

Many of the bunkers had hay inside of them when Mr and Mrs Hinds first purchased the property.

The curved, concrete walls are ten inches thick and have a metre of earth on top of them, while the bunkers are 3m in radius and 12m long.  

The former explosive storage facility had 20 reinforced concrete storage bunkers that housed up to 2,500 tonnes of explosives.

Mrs Hinds said the bunkers (pictured in 1985) are perfect for two people to stay inside of with sound bouncing off of the walls

Mrs Hinds said the bunkers (pictured in 1985) are perfect for two people to stay inside of with sound bouncing off of the walls

The area was seen as the ‘last stand’ if Australia was invaded through the northern part of the country, but the ammunition reserve was never needed. 

The former base sits on a whopping 360-ache block of land.  

Several people who have stayed at the accommodation have raved about their experience.

‘Pity we were only staying one night. The owners are wonderful people and have a very friendly dog who thinks he is the boss,’ one social media user said.

Another said: ‘Heard about this place through friends and after staying here we will be recommending it to our friends in the future. 

‘The place is not just accommodation, it is an experience. We stayed in the bunkers which (despite being dated as was renovated in the 80s) were very homely.’

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