in

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti warns the city is 'on the brink' of another stay-at-home order

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti warned the city was ‘on the brink’ of another stay-at-home order and admitted that the economy resumed too quickly as cases continue to spike in the coronavirus hot spot.

In the same interview on CNN‘s State of the Union, Garcetti blasted President Trump for a ‘lack of national leadership’ and giving ‘rants in the Rose Garden’ instead of enacting a feasible coronavirus response. 

‘I think we’re on the brink of that,’ Garcetti said about a potential second city lockodown. 

‘I think a lot of people don’t understand, mayors often have no control what opens up and doesn’t — that’s either at a state or county level. And I do agree, that those things happened too quickly.’

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti revealed on CNN's State of the Union that the city was 'on the brink' of another stay-at-home order as cases surge in the state

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti revealed on CNN’s State of the Union that the city was ‘on the brink’ of another stay-at-home order as cases surge in the state

Garcetti added that cities shouldn’t rely on the ‘domino effect’ of reopening businesses in quick succession because ‘that is a failed way to go forward.’

‘Listen to the science, track the data and be smart.’

But rather than implement a broad closure across the city ‘like a cleaver,’ he’d rather make targeted, specific interventions that can help the most vulnerable citizens, 

Garcetti’s admittance comes as California is further inundated with coronavirus cases and deaths that have surged in the last several weeks.

So far, more than 384,600 Californians have been infected and nearly 8,000 people have died since the virus’ arrival into the United States in January. 

The California Department of Public Health on Monday revealed the seven-day average of new cases per day is 9,127.  The average set the week prior was 8,664.

Pictured; New data from the California Department of Public Health revealed that there are nearly 7,00 new confirmed COVID-19 hospitalizations

Pictured; New data from the California Department of Public Health revealed that there are nearly 7,00 new confirmed COVID-19 hospitalizations 

There are 6,899 patients hospitalized with coronavirus and another 1,921 in intensive care units.

The number of suspected coronavirus-related hospitalizations was nearly 2,000 and 186 may be in intensive care units.

Californians from the ages of 18 to 49 accounted for the highest number of confirmed cases among age groups at 231,171.  Residents aged 50 to 64 were the seconds largest group with 74,999 confirmed cases. 

The Los Angeles dashboard showed that the county’s case numbers were far above their neighbors.

Los Angeles County amassed a staggering 156,039 confirmed cases, while Riverside County came in second with 30,340.  

California Gov. Gavin Newsom last week ordered new statewide closures of indoor restaurants, wineries and tasting rooms ,movie theaters, bars, family entertainment centers and other businesses.

According to National National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins, testing sites are so backlogged that it can take more than a week to get results. 

That leaves more than enough time for unsure residents to spread the coronavirus while awaiting confirmation.

Garcetti also blasted President Trump during the interview for a 'lack of national leadership' that forced individual states and counties to fend for themselves

Garcetti also blasted President Trump during the interview for a ‘lack of national leadership’ that forced individual states and counties to fend for themselves 

Garcetti put blame for the rocky reopening in Los Angeles County, and across the United States, on a ‘lack of national leadership’

 ‘I think a lot of things went wrong. We’ve seen no national leadership,’ said Garcetti.

‘We’ve had to stand up testing centers on our own, we’ve had to do so much that is outside of our lane because of the lack of national leadership – but I also think some people are just exhausted.

‘They were sold a bill of goods, [the Trump administration] said it was under control, they said it would be over soon. And I think when leaders say that, people react and they do the wrong things. 

Garcetti further called out the Trump administration for not implementing some form of a national mask mandate.

President Trump (pictured) has made repeated attempts to downsize the coronavirus pandemic in an effort to reopen the economy as soon as possible

President Trump (pictured) has made repeated attempts to downsize the coronavirus pandemic in an effort to reopen the economy as soon as possible 

‘We are the first big city in America to mandate masks when nobody else was doing it, and it took another month and a half to see that at the national level – more than two months for our president to don a mask,’ Garcetti said.

‘So, this has been politicized when it should have been unified. We were left on our own when we should of had help. And we know this will be a marathon.’

Garcetti appeared to directly speak to Trump when he said to ‘stop telling people this will be over soon.’

‘Let people know this is a marathon where we will have to push through every single mile, and if we don’t come together as a nation more people will die.’ 

Garcetti added: ‘Where we need reagents, we’re instead getting secret agents coming into cities like Portland. Where we need help with rents, we’re instead getting rants from the Rose Garden. 

‘We need national leadership and this is the last chance for this president to prove that he cares about the people in this country.’

Garcetti’s mention of Portland referred to the ongoing Black Lives Matter protests that have overtaken that city and several others since May.

Several local Oregon politicians have blasted the arrival of federal agents (pictured center), who are not required to follow the same policing restrictions as local authorities and can use methods like tear gas (pictured)

Several local Oregon politicians have blasted the arrival of federal agents (pictured center), who are not required to follow the same policing restrictions as local authorities and can use methods like tear gas (pictured)








Trump has been repeatedly criticized for his heavy handed, militarized response to demonstrations as he unequivocally sided with law enforcement.

He appeared to brush off pleas against police violence and, in his most recent efforts, sent federal agents to quell protests in Portland.

As of Sunday, protests have continued throughout the city and federal agents appeared to have done little more then escalate already boiling tensions.  

On Sunday, Garcetti shared a photo showing that Los Angeles’ coronavirus spread was listed under ‘high risk,’ which was categorized as orange.

‘Our COVID-19 threat level remains at orange. Our collective behavior can bend the curve and avoid going to red. Please avoid gatherings and wear your mask,’ he wrote. 

Eric Garcetti shared that Los Angeles' spread of COVID-19 was classified as 'high risk,' but a community effort could stop the meter from turning red

Eric Garcetti shared that Los Angeles’ spread of COVID-19 was classified as ‘high risk,’ but a community effort could stop the meter from turning red 

NIH Director Collins said part of the reason why the pandemic still has a strong grip on the United States is because the public did not take it seriously.

‘Why are we doing so poorly?’ Collins said on NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday.

‘The rest of the country, perhaps imagining this was just a New York problem, kind of went about their business, didn’t – really pay that much attention to CDC’s recommendations about the phases necessary to open up safely and jumped over some of those hoops.’

President Trump is among those accused of not following advice from the CDC and downplaying the pandemic.

During an interview with Chris Wallace on Fox News on Sunday, Trump continued to shrug off concerns about recent coronavirus spikes and said he’d be ‘right eventually’ about it disappearing.

‘I’ll be right eventually. I will be right eventually. You know I said, ‘It’s going to disappear.’ I’ll say it again,’ the president told Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace in an hour-long interview.

'I'll be right eventually,' Donald Trump asserted Sunday morning when talking about his claims that the coronavirus threat will 'disappear' eventually

‘I’ll be right eventually,’ Donald Trump asserted Sunday morning when talking about his claims that the coronavirus threat will ‘disappear’ eventually  

‘It’s going to disappear and I’ll be right,’ he continued.

Wallace pushed back: ‘But does that – does that discredit you?’

‘I don’t think so,’ Trump countered. ‘You know why? Because I’ve been right probably more than anybody else.’

Trump also claimed that ‘many of those cases shouldn’t even be cases.’

 ‘Many of those cases are young people that would heal in a day,’ he said. ‘They have the sniffles and we put it down as a test.’

Trump’s blasé response came amid claims his administration is attempting to block $25billion for contract tracing and coronavirus testing in the next stimulus package

Administration officials are wrangling with Republican senators over the provisions in the GOP stimulus bill, which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is set to unveil this week, according to the Washington Post.

Unnamed people involved in the talks told the Post that the administration’s position has angered some Republican senators, who are trying to push back and get the additional funding in the bill.

At issue is money that would go to the CDC and states to test and trace, as well as billions that would go to the Pentagon and State Department to address the pandemic at home and abroad. 








One person involved in the talks told the Post that Senate Republicans were seeking to allocate $25 billion for states, but that certain administration officials want that number to be zero.

Some White House officials reportedly argue that billions for states in the last round of stimulus has yet to be spent.

McConnell’s bill, which would have to be reconciled with the ambitious $3 trillion package proposed by House Democrats, is likely to be the last round of stimulus before the election in November.

With COVID-19 cases hitting alarming new highs and the death roll rising, the pandemic’s devastating cycle is happening all over again, leaving Congress little choice but to engineer another costly rescue.

Businesses are shutting down again in many states, schools cannot fully reopen and jobs are disappearing, all while federal emergency aid expires. Without a successful federal plan to control the outbreak, Congress heads back to work with no endgame to the crisis in sight.

‘It’s not going to magically disappear,’ said a somber McConnell during a visit to a hospital in his home state of Kentucky to thank front-line workers.   

Source link

Carrie Underwood gives fans a first look at her upcoming Christmas album titled My Gift

Jennifer Dulos lead investigator says blood spatter in garage indicates 'serious, violent assault'