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Migrants packed into tiny dinghy desperately bail out water as they try to get across Channel

Migrants packed into a tiny dinghy were forced to bail out water after the raft started sinking while they were trying to cross the Channel.

The dinghy was carrying more than a dozen migrants who were trying to reach the UK despite strong winds at sea.

The boat, carrying men, women and children was intercepted by Border Force officials.








Migrants packed into a tiny dinghy were forced to bail out water after the raft started sinking while they were trying to cross the Channel

Migrants packed into a tiny dinghy were forced to bail out water after the raft started sinking while they were trying to cross the Channel

They were seen using plastic bottles to desperately get rid of the water flooding the dinghy. 

A second boat is understood to have landed on the beach at Kingsdown near Deal in Kent. 

While Wednesday’s figures have not yet been released by the Home Office, it comes after 151 migrants were detained in 11 incidents in the Channel on Tuesday.  

So far in September, 1,464 migrants have arrived, including a single-day record of 416 on 28 boats on September 2.

Tidal changes are expected tomorrow for the next few days with warnings from French authorities for water users to be aware.

The dinghy was carrying more than a dozen migrants who were trying to reach the UK despite strong winds at sea

The dinghy was carrying more than a dozen migrants who were trying to reach the UK despite strong winds at sea

The boat, carrying men, women and children was intercepted by Border Force officials near the Kent coast

The boat, carrying men, women and children was intercepted by Border Force officials near the Kent coast

A second boat is understood to have landed on the beach at Kingsdown near Deal in Kent

A second boat is understood to have landed on the beach at Kingsdown near Deal in Kent

Attempts to halt migrant crossings from Calais to Dover could result in more deaths as people attempt the dangerous journey across the Channel from further along the coast, MPs have heard.

Charities said they did not believe Home Secretary Priti Patel and other department ministers would succeed in making the route ‘unviable’ unless steps were taken to offer migrants more support to discourage them from making the journey.

Instead people may try to make the crossing from further along the south coast, making it more dangerous as they attempt to navigate a wider expanse of water, campaigners warned.

They were seen using plastic bottles to desperately get rid of the water flooding the dinghy

They were seen using plastic bottles to desperately get rid of the water flooding the dinghy

So far in September, 1,464 migrants have arrived, including a single-day record of 416 on 28 boats on September 2

So far in September, 1,464 migrants have arrived, including a single-day record of 416 on 28 boats on September 2

So far in September, 1,464 migrants have arrived, including a single-day record of 416 on 28 boats on September 2

So far in September, 1,464 migrants have arrived, including a single-day record of 416 on 28 boats on September 2

Maddy Allen, advocacy manager at the Help Refugees charity, told the Commons Home Affairs Committee on Wednesday that efforts by the British and French governments to cut off the route could see people spread further along the coast.

Her comments came after committee member Diane Abbott asked whether it was realistic for the Government to eliminate the crossings.

Ms Allen said she hoped the crossings would stop as it was an ‘incredibly dangerous journey’, adding: ‘As the Home Office and their French counterparts strive to make this route unviable – blocking access to beaches, increasing securitisation, making investments – I think there’s probably a number of options that could play out.

‘People will begin to make these crossings from further afield, we are already seeing this.

‘And it’s going to spread out further up and down the coast. And that will directly result in an increase in deaths in the water because you’re crossing a larger body of water to make that journey.’

Wearing a face-mask, puffer jacket and Adidas tracksuit, a migrant father was photographed walking with his wife and two children along the coastal path at Kingsdown Beach in Deal yesterday

Wearing a face-mask, puffer jacket and Adidas tracksuit, a migrant father was photographed walking with his wife and two children along the coastal path at Kingsdown Beach in Deal yesterday

Queues of freight traffic and blockages at ports post-Brexit, depending on what customs regulations are agreed, could also affect how people make the crossings, she said, adding: ‘I think we will see people making more dangerous journeys.

‘I think we will start to see different and more dangerous routes created if other existing, established routes start to close down.’

Beth Gardiner-Smith, chief executive of Safe Passage UK, said: ‘I would hope they could (make the route unviable). We don’t want to see people crossing by boat.

‘I’m not sure it’s realistic without a serious investment in more support on the ground in northern France, more support to get people into the system and more safe and legal options for people to be able to come to the UK in limited circumstances.

Around 400 people including families, believed to have crossed the Channel in small boats, are to be housed in temporary accommodation at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, from next week

Around 400 people including families, believed to have crossed the Channel in small boats, are to be housed in temporary accommodation at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, from next week

‘So no, I don’t believe it’s realistic at this point.’

The charities told the committee the coronavirus pandemic was likely to have triggered the recent surge in crossings and also warned that child migrants in northern France who have relatives in the UK are being pushed into the hands of trafficking gangs amid delays in processing claims to join their families.

The hearing came as it emerged Channel migrants are to be housed in military barracks while their asylum claims are processed.

Around 400 people including families will be put in temporary accommodation at Napier Barracks in Folkestone, Kent, from next week.

A barracks in Pembrokeshire, Wales, is also being considered for use by the Home Office, the PA news agency understands. 

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