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Military guards the streets of Bali fining those who refuse to wear a face mask during COVID-19

Once bustling with tourists and life, the desolate streets of Bali have now been swarmed by the military personnel who are fining anyone who refuses to wear a face mask. 

Alarming photos have emerged showing soldiers walking down the streets of Denpasar handing out fines of 100,000 rupiah ($9.30 AUD) to anyone without a face covering.

Soldiers have also been seen setting up COVID-19 checkpoints across the Indonesian island as cases of the deadly virus continue to grow and burden the country.

The military are now a common sight on the streets of Bali. Locals are fined 100,000 rupiah if they head outside without a face mask

The military are now a common sight on the streets of Bali. Locals are fined 100,000 rupiah if they head outside without a face mask

Masks were made mandatory in April but fines were enforced in Bali earlier this month. Pictured is a man wearing a face mask in Denpasar

Masks were made mandatory in April but fines were enforced in Bali earlier this month. Pictured is a man wearing a face mask in Denpasar

Municipal police officers are seen at a coronavirus checkpoint in Denpasar on Monday. Fines will be handed out to anyone who refuses to wear a mask

Municipal police officers are seen at a coronavirus checkpoint in Denpasar on Monday. Fines will be handed out to anyone who refuses to wear a mask

Face masks have been mandatory in public across Indonesia since early April.

Authorities previously came up with a range of punishments for those refusing to comply including performing push-ups and buying one kilogram of rice to go towards Bali locals severely affected by the pandemic. 

Some police officers even made offenders dance. 

At the end of August, the Balinese governor, Wayan Koster announced those who did not comply would now be hit with a fine. 

‘This regulation is to follow up on Presidential Instruction that aims to make people more orderly and disciplined in implementing health protocols as an effort to prevent the transmission of COVID-19,’ he said. 

One man is seen being fined 100,000 Rupiah not not wearing a face mask in Denpasar in Bali on Monday

One man is seen being fined 100,000 Rupiah not not wearing a face mask in Denpasar in Bali on Monday

Soldiers keep a watchful eye on Balinese residents that walk through a COVID-19 checkpoint in Denpasar

Soldiers keep a watchful eye on Balinese residents that walk through a COVID-19 checkpoint in Denpasar

A police officer takes money handed over by a Balinese resident who was caught without a mask. Previously officers made residents who weren't wearing masks do push-ups or dance

A police officer takes money handed over by a Balinese resident who was caught without a mask. Previously officers made residents who weren’t wearing masks do push-ups or dance

Bali was supposed to welcome back international tourists from Friday but has since announced this has been pushed back until the end of the year. 

‘The Indonesian government couldn’t reopen its doors to foreign travellers until the end of 2020 as we remain a red zone,’ Mr Koster said in a statement last month. 

‘The situation is not conducive to allowing foreign tourists to come to Indonesia, including to Bali.

‘Bali cannot fail because it could adversely impact the image of Indonesia, including Bali, in the eyes of the world, which could prove counter-productive to the recovery of travel.’ 

The popular holiday destination is now struggling to make up for the heavy loss in tourism.

Bali attracted 6.3million foreign visitors in 2019 – up 3.6 per cent from a year earlier – but that number has since crashed due to coronavirus travel bans.    

Residents are seen exercising with face masks in Denpasar in Bali this week. Indonesia has recorded more than 197,000 COVID-19 cases and 8,000 deaths

Residents are seen exercising with face masks in Denpasar in Bali this week. Indonesia has recorded more than 197,000 COVID-19 cases and 8,000 deaths

As of June this year only 880,000 foreign tourists made it to Bali, according to Statista.com.

The lack of visitors has forced many businesses to close, including hotels and the marketplace shopfronts in Kuta. 

Since then footage has emerged of monkeys taking over hotels, jumping from balconies into pools. 

About 81 per cent of Balinese households have been economically impacted, not-for-profit organisation Kopernik found.

In a report in June, it found 44 per cent of those surveyed had either permanently or temporarily lost their jobs as well as 56 per cent having a decrease in income. 

Indonesia has had 197,000 cases of the deadly virus and 8,130 deaths. 

Monkeys have taken over abandoned hotels in Bali, enjoying the empty space and swimming pool (pictured in June)

Monkeys have taken over abandoned hotels in Bali, enjoying the empty space and swimming pool (pictured in June)

The tourist-hotspot attracts millions of foreign visitors each year - which grew 3.6 per cent to 6.3million in 2019. Pictured: A woman at Kuta, Lombok, Indonesia

The tourist-hotspot attracts millions of foreign visitors each year – which grew 3.6 per cent to 6.3million in 2019. Pictured: A woman at Kuta, Lombok, Indonesia

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