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British NHS worker living in Oz is flying home to aid service that made her ‘nurse she is today’

British NHS worker living in Australia is flying home to help the service that made her ‘nurse she is today’ – and is determined to ‘work through’ its lack of equipment

  • Laura McLaughin, 27, returning from Australia where she worked for three years 
  • Says she’s determined to help the NHS which made her the ‘nurse she is today’
  • Admits the lack of equipment worries her but is keen to ‘work through’ problem  
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

A British NHS worker living in Australia is flying home today to help the service that made her ‘nurse she is today’ – and says she is determined to ‘work through’ the problem of its lack of equipment. 

Laura McLaughin, 27, has worked Down Under for three years, but is returning to the UK to treat those suffering from coronavirus – which has claimed 424 lives so far. 

She appeared on This Morning via video link from Sydney, where she insisted she would help the NHS in its ‘time of need’. 

Laura added that while the lack of equipment worries her, she and other medical professionals will ‘work through that’ to help people. 

British NHS worker Laura McLaughin, 27, (pictured) is flying to the UK from Australia today to help the service that made her the 'nurse she is today'

British NHS worker Laura McLaughin, 27, (pictured) is flying to the UK from Australia today to help the service that made her the ‘nurse she is today’

Laura appeared on This Morning via video link today, where she told hosts Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby she is determined to 'work through' the lack of equipment

Laura appeared on This Morning via video link today, where she told hosts Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby she is determined to ‘work through’ the lack of equipment

‘The NHS trained me up to be the nurse I am today. So I need to be there during its time of need,’ she told hosts Phillip Schofield and Holly Willoughby. 

Laura admitted it had been ’emotionally charged situation’ trying to get a flight out of Australia, as her planned British Airways flight with a stopover in Singapore was cancelled.  

She said: ‘I was prompt on Monday booking a flight. On Monday – or Tuesday at midnight in Australia – they said Singapore Airport was going to be shut, so I started to panic about how I was going to get home.’ 

Laura added: ‘There are so many in the same situation as me, saying the Embassy isn’t helping. They’re still selling flights even though transits are shut.’ 

Laura admitted while the lack of equipment worries her, she and other medical professionals will 'work through that' to help people

Laura admitted while the lack of equipment worries her, she and other medical professionals will ‘work through that’ to help people

Eventually Laura managed to get a flight with Quantas, and says she’ll be heading to an area with large staff shortages. 

When quizzed on where that is, she said: ‘Anywhere around Preston or Southport. Anywhere to help the staff shortages. The unions have messaged us, they know what they’re doing, there’s plenty of young fit people ready to do it as well.’  

When asked if she was worried about a lack of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), Laura admitted: ‘Yes. We need to work though that don’t we, and hope we can get the equipment we need in the end and just try and help people.’ 

Laura told how it had been an 'emotionally charged situation' trying to get a flight out of Australia, as her planned British Airways flight with a stopover in Singapore was cancelled

Laura told how it had been an ’emotionally charged situation’ trying to get a flight out of Australia, as her planned British Airways flight with a stopover in Singapore was cancelled

NHS England said this week that millions more items of PPE had been delivered over the last few days to hospitals, ambulance trusts and care homes, among others.

This follows a letter in the Sunday Times signed by almost 4,000 NHS workers who called on the Prime Minister to ‘protect the lives of the life-savers’ and resolve the ‘unacceptable’ shortage of protective equipment.

In their letter, the 4,000-strong group said medical workers were ‘putting their lives on the line every day’ by treating coronavirus patients without appropriate protection, and called on Mr Johnson to ensure an adequate supply of masks, safety glasses, gloves, aprons and protective suits.  

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Written by Angle News

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