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NOAA warns La Niña has a 75% chance of plaguing the US with hurricanes and drought through winter

Parts of the US are battling wildfires, while others are cleaning up after the strongest hurricane to hit in 160 years – but a new report suggests more extreme weather could be on the horizon.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) sent out a warning that La Niña conditions were present in the Pacific Ocean last month and is set to make its way to the US.

This weather phenomenon forms by a build-up of below average cooler water that lowers surface temperatures – experts observed the surface at 26.6 degrees Fahrenheit over the past few weeks.

NOAA says there is a 75 percent chance of La Niña continuing through the Northern hemisphere winter until early 2021, which could bring more hurricanes and droughts to areas.

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The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) sent out a warning that La Niña conditions were present in the Pacific Ocean last month and are set to make its way to the US. The western region could see less rain, while the Atlantic states may be hit with hurricanes

NOAA observed below-average temperatures stretching across the central and eastern regions of the Pacific Ocean in August, along with atmospheric circulation anomalies hanging over the surface – the sure sign La Niña has arrived. 

The weather patterns is known to release dry weather in the west, powerful hurricanes in the Atlantic and flooding to other parts of the world like Australia and South America.

Ryan Truchelut, president of Weather Tiger LLC, told Bloomberg: ‘We’re already in a bad position, and La Nina puts us in a situation where fire-weather conditions persist into November and possibly even December.’

‘It is exacerbating existing heat and drought issues.’

This weather phenomenon forms by a build-up of below average cooler water that lowers surface temperatures - experts observed the surface at 26.6 degrees Fahrenheit over the past few weeks

This weather phenomenon forms by a build-up of below average cooler water that lowers surface temperatures – experts observed the surface at 26.6 degrees Fahrenheit over the past few weeks

NOAA observed below-average temperatures stretching across the central and eastern regions of the Pacific Ocean in August, along with atmospheric circulation anomalies hanging over the surface -

NOAA observed below-average temperatures stretching across the central and eastern regions of the Pacific Ocean in August, along with atmospheric circulation anomalies hanging over the surface –

One-third of the US was labeled in at least a moderate drought last month, with more than 93 percent of land area in Utah, Colorado, Nevada and New Mexico at some level.

And the Central US has been enduring a period of dryness as well, coupled with above average temperatures.

Southern California is also in the midst of the region’s hottest summers, according to the National Weather Service.

The US Drought Monitor shows above average dryness is plaguing 11 US states in the west, covering nearly 87 percent of land area – and more than half of California is in drought.

Rain is in dire need for much of The Golden State as it battles the worst wildfire season on record, which has scorched more than 2.5 million acres of land since starting in August.

California’s winter is typically the rainy season, which tackles Santa Ana winds spreading fires that have already ignited. However, with La Niña forming, the area will experience less rain and drier conditions that could heighten this wildfire season

California’s winter is typically the rainy season, which tackles Santa Ana winds spreading fires that have already ignited. However, with La Niña forming, the area will experience less rain and drier conditions that could heighten this wildfire season

The weather pattern also increases hurricanes forming in the Atlantic, which can hit coastal regions of Florida and areas along the Gulf. Hurricane Laura blew through Louisiana last month that brought 150 mile per hour winds rushing through the southern state

The weather pattern also increases hurricanes forming in the Atlantic, which can hit coastal regions of Florida and areas along the Gulf. Hurricane Laura blew through Louisiana last month that brought 150 mile per hour winds rushing through the southern state

California’s winter is typically the rainy season, which tackles Santa Ana winds spreading fires that have already ignited.

However, with La Niña forming, the area will experience less rain and drier conditions that could heighten this wildfire season.

The weather pattern also increases hurricanes forming in the Atlantic, which can hit coastal regions of Florida and areas along the Gulf.

Hurricane Laura blew through Louisiana last month that brought 150 mile per hour winds rushing through the southern state.

And with La Niña brewing in the last three months of hurricane season, this could mean more storms are on the way that have even more power to release on land.

WHAT IS LA NINA?  

A weather pattern that occurs in the Pacific Ocean every three to seven years.

It causes abnormally strong winds that make the ocean colder than it normally is.

This small change in temperature can trigger local weather patterns all over the world, including torrential rain, plunging temperatures and cyclones.

Rain clouds normally form over warm ocean water. La Niña blows all of this warm water to the western Pacific.

This means that places like Indonesia, Australia and southern Africa can get much more rain than usual.

It typically unfolds during the end of autumn or early winter.

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