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Photographer captures incredible close-up shots of a jumping spider showing every hair and eye

Close encounter of the arachnid kind: Photographer captures incredible zoomed-in shots of a jumping spider showing every hair and eye in magnificent detail

  • Professional photographer Calvin Taylor Lee takes creepy-crawly close-ups
  • His latest model is a tiny jumping spider that belongs to the species Hyllus diardi
  • Mr Lee captured the stunning shot at his home with a Sony a7RII digital camera
  • Among his other subjects are horse-flies, common wasps and ghost mantises

If you get arachnophobia, you might want to read a different MailOnline article.

Professional photographer Calvin Taylor Lee has captured incredible close-up shots of a jumping spider that show its every fine hair and eye in magnificent detail.

The tiny model — which belongs to the species Hyllus diardi — sports four pairs of eyes which give it incredible vision to help catch its prey.

If the present images weren’t incredible enough, Mr Lee reckons that he can get in even closer next time.  

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Professional photographer Calvin Taylor Lee has captured incredible close-up shots of a jumping spider that show its every fine hair and eye in magnificent detail

Professional photographer Calvin Taylor Lee has captured incredible close-up shots of a jumping spider that show its every fine hair and eye in magnificent detail

The tiny model — which belongs to the species Hyllus diardi — sports four pairs of eyes which give it incredible vision to help catch its prey

The tiny model — which belongs to the species Hyllus diardi — sports four pairs of eyes which give it incredible vision to help catch its prey

The professional photographer enjoys taking so-called ‘macro’ — or extreme close-up — pictures of creepy crawlies in his spare time.

He took the stunning shot of the jumping spider on a recent day off.

Mr Lee, who hails from Scunthorpe in Lincolnshire, said that it took him just four attempts to capture an image of the spider that he was happy with.

He added that he thinks another attempt could see him get up to 30 millimetres closer with cropping.

The picture was taken at Mr Lee’s home, using a Sony a7RII digital camera with a macro lens attached.

Mr Lee doesn’t just take pictures of spiders, however — his other close-up subjects have included horse-flies, wasps and ghost mantises.

If the present images weren't incredible enough, Mr Lee reckons that he can get in even closer to the tiny little arachnid models next time

If the present images weren’t incredible enough, Mr Lee reckons that he can get in even closer to the tiny little arachnid models next time

Mr Lee, who hails from Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire, said that it took him just four attempts to capture an image of the spider that he was happy with. Pictured, the jumping spider

Mr Lee, who hails from Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire, said that it took him just four attempts to capture an image of the spider that he was happy with. Pictured, the jumping spider

He added that he thinks another attempt could see him get up to 30 millimetres closer. Pictured, a different arachnid captured by Mr Lee, this one being a regal jumping spider

He added that he thinks another attempt could see him get up to 30 millimetres closer. Pictured, a different arachnid captured by Mr Lee, this one being a regal jumping spider

CALVIN’S CREEPY-CRAWLY CLOSE-UP COLLECTION 

Mr Lee doesn’t just take pictures of spiders, however — his other close-up subjects have included horse-flies, wasps and ghost mantises.

Pictured, a horsefly

Pictured, a horsefly

 

Pictured, a common wasp, also known as 'Vespula vulgaris'

Pictured, a bumblebee of the species Bombus lapidarius

Pictured left, a common wasp — or ‘Vespula vulgaris’ — and, right, a bumblebee of the species Bombus lapidarius

Pictured, a close-up of Heterochaeta orientalis, the giant African stick mantis

Pictured, a close-up of Heterochaeta orientalis, the giant African stick mantis

Pictured, Phyllocrania paradoxa, which is commonly known as the ghost mantis

Pictured, Phyllocrania paradoxa, which is commonly known as the ghost mantis

 

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