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Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank say they are 'honoured' to have two koalas named after them

Princess Eugenie and husband Jack Brooksbank say they are ‘honoured’ to have had two koala joeys named after them at a Sydney wildlife park.

The two joeys, whose names were announced as Eugenie and Jack today, were born at Featherdale Sydney Wildlife Park at the start of the year to first time dad Archer and mum Brooklyn.

Sharing a ‘cheeky’ video of Eugenie the koala winking to her Instagram page, the Princess wrote: ‘These two little baby koalas are living safely at Featherdale Wildlife Park in a wonderful habitat after the devastating bushfires earlier this year and we are honoured that they have been named after Jack and I.’

Eugenie the koala joey at Featherdale Sydney Wildlife Park

Jack the koala joey at Featherdale Sydney Wildlife Park

The two joeys, Eugenie (left) and Jack (right), were born at Featherdale Sydney Wildlife Park at the start of the year to first time dad Archer and mum Brooklyn

The royal added: ‘So proud to be a part of rebuilding and supporting these sanctuaries.’

A 19-year-old Princess Eugenie visited the wildlife park in 2009 during her gap year and she’s said to have been a ‘huge supporter ever since’. 

Featherdale Zoo Director Chad Staples, who hand-raised the joeys’ father Archer, told The Morning Show: ‘They’ve [Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank] been massive supporters. 

‘They’re dying to come back out, obviously when everyone can travel again.

Princess Eugenie and husband Jack Brooksbank say they are 'honoured' to have had the joeys named after them following a tough year for the species, with 30,000 lost to wildfires

Princess Eugenie and husband Jack Brooksbank say they are ‘honoured’ to have had the joeys named after them following a tough year for the species, with 30,000 lost to wildfires








‘It’ll be great because that will help us to boost awareness around habitat and what we can do for them.’

The joeys, who emerged from their mother Brooklyn’s pouch in June, are said to be in good health, now venturing short distances away from their mother and displaying their own personalities.

The positive news comes after a tough year for wildlife in Australia, particularly koalas, with 30,000 lost to wildfires and a massive 71 per cent of the population wiped out in New South Wales alone.   

Princess Eugenie shared a humorous clip of the joey which has been named after her appearing to wink at the camera, she wrote: 'Eugenie's a bit cheeky... winking to the world'

Princess Eugenie shared a humorous clip of the joey which has been named after her appearing to wink at the camera, she wrote: ‘Eugenie’s a bit cheeky… winking to the world’

A message shared by Princess Eugenie to her Instagram, thanking the sanctuary for naming the joeys after her and her husband Jack

A message shared by Princess Eugenie to her Instagram, thanking the sanctuary for naming the joeys after her and her husband Jack

Although the joeys’ father Archer had a tough start to life with his mother abandoning him, he was taken in by Chad who kept him in a pouch and bottle-fed him three times a night until he was introduced to the Koala Sanctuary at Featherdale. 

The koala character is now well known as the face of the park’s individual animal sponsorship program, with his own social media channels. 

He was also voted Australia’s Cutest Animal in 2019, a quality which his two joeys seem to share.  

Featherdale Zoo Director Chad Staples (right) and Archer the rescued Koala Bear, father to joeys Eugenie and Jack

Featherdale Zoo Director Chad Staples (right) and Archer the rescued Koala Bear, father to joeys Eugenie and Jack

Featherdale wildlife park in Sydney, where Archer is the face of the park's individual animal sponsorship program

Featherdale wildlife park in Sydney, where Archer is the face of the park’s individual animal sponsorship program

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