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Sarah Caisip's Aunty Jane said family was 'extremely distressed' by grieving daughter's funeral ban

The aunt of a grieving, young woman who was forced to miss her father’s funeral said Queensland’s strict coronavirus rules had caused the family a lot of distress.

Sarah Caisip was barred from being allowed to leave her hotel quarantine in Brisbane to attend her father’s funeral, despite living in Canberra which has had zero coronavirus cases since July 10. 

Instead of being able to grieve with her 11-year-old sister Isobel Prendergast and her mother Myrna Prendergast, the grieving 26-year-old daughter was instead only allowed to view her deceased father Bernard Prendergast if she wore personal protective equipment.








The aunt of a grieving, young woman who was forced to miss her father's funeral said Queensland's strict coronavirus rules had caused the family a lot of distress. Pictured is Sarah Caisip alighting from a ute wearing personal protective equipment to view her father's body

The aunt of a grieving, young woman who was forced to miss her father’s funeral said Queensland’s strict coronavirus rules had caused the family a lot of distress. Pictured is Sarah Caisip alighting from a ute wearing personal protective equipment to view her father’s body

Ms Caisip’s aunt, identified on Brisbane radio 4BC only as Jane, said her niece was traumatised at only being allowed to see father in a casket, as police and Army officers surrounded her, instead of grieving with her loved ones.

‘That was pretty upsetting. It was quite distressing to see that,’ she said.

Aunty Jane said Ms Caisip’s mother and younger sister were too upset to complain.

‘She was really too upset to say very much at all and her Isobel was extremely distressed,’ she said.

Making matters more distressing, Ms Caisip was barred from talking to her young sister as she arrived at the Mount Gravatt cemetery – 20 minutes after the funeral had finished.

Instead of being able to grieve with her 11-year-old sister Isobel Prendergast (left) and her mother Myrna Prendergast (right), the grieving 26-year-old daughter was instead only allowed to view her deceased father Bernard Prendergast if she wore personal protective equipment

Instead of being able to grieve with her 11-year-old sister Isobel Prendergast (left) and her mother Myrna Prendergast (right), the grieving 26-year-old daughter was instead only allowed to view her deceased father Bernard Prendergast if she wore personal protective equipment

‘It was very upsetting for everybody,’ Aunty Jane said. ‘Sarah would not even have been able to do that.

Sarah Caisip was barred from being allowed to leave her hotel quarantine in Brisbane to attend her father's funeral, despite living in Canberra which has had zero coronavirus cases since July 10

Sarah Caisip was barred from being allowed to leave her hotel quarantine in Brisbane to attend her father’s funeral, despite living in Canberra which has had zero coronavirus cases since July 10

‘It was under such distressing circumstances.’ 

Queensland’s Labor government refused to allow Ms Caispin see her father as he was dying of cancer.

Mr Prendergast died on September 2, 2020, before his daughter could farewell him.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk on Friday claimed she felt the pain of cases like Ms Caisip’s – a day after telling Parliament her case was determined by the state’s Chief Health Officer Dr Jeannette Young.

‘I feel these issues personally just like everybody else does,’ Ms Palaszczuk said.

‘I am human just like everyone else. These people are human beings as well. ‘Who wouldn’t be touched by these cases. They are heartbreaking.’ 

Ms Palaszczuk has told Queensland’s Legislative Assembly that Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s call to her, pleading for Ms Caisip to be allowed to attend her father’s funeral, amounted to bullying. 








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