in

Selfie-seekers are risking their lives to take photos at popular Queensland tourist spot

Loading...

Instagram selfie-seekers risk their lives to take spectacular photos at the edge of cliff with a 200-metre drop – and rangers say it’s a only matter of time before someone dies

  • Tourists are risking their lives at a popular lookout spot by flouting safety rules
  • The overhang at Boolimba Bluff in central Queensland sits above a 200m drop
  • Safety railings are intended to stop visitors from getting too close to the edge
  • But guides say visitors are increasingly ignoring rules to get the perfect photo 

Tourists are risking their lives at a popular lookout spot by flouting safety rules to achieve the perfect Instagram photo, tour guides have warned.

Visitors to the Boolimba Bluff lookout in central Queensland’s Carnarvon Gorge are protected from a 200m sheer drop by metal safety barriers.

But tour guides in the national park claim social media has driven a rise in the number of visitors stepping over railings to get as close to the edge as possible.

Tourists are risking their lives at the Boolimba Bluff lookout spot by flouting safety rules to achieve the perfect Instagram photo, tour guides have warned (pictured visitor posing on the bluff)

Tour guides in the national park say social media has changed the way tourists interact with the popular tourist spot (pictured woman posing inside the railings at Boolimba Bluff)

‘It’s just a matter of time before we’re cleaning up an unfortunate mess down the bottom,’ guide Michelle Whitehouse said

‘It’s just a matter of time before we’re cleaning up an unfortunate mess down the bottom,’ guide Michelle Whitehouse told ABC News.

She said the bluff was made from a porous sandstone, which meant visitors risked falling to their death as a result of cliff collapse.  

Ms Whitehouse added while eye-catching photos of tourists at the edge of the bluff helped to build the gorge’s profile, it meant others then expected to re-create their shots.

‘When they get up there they realise there’s a barrier between them and that experience and they go, “well if those people before me can jump it, why can’t I do the same?”’ she said.

Her partner and fellow guide Simon Long said safety regulations made it very clear where visitors should and shouldn’t be going in the park.

Loading...

‘(It comes) from a lack of research on the part of people that are coming to use the gorge to generate content for social media,’ he said.  

Ms Whitehouse added while eye-catching photos of tourists at the edge of the bluff helped to build the gorge’s profile, it meant others then expected to re-create their shots

Tourists risk a $400 fine for ignoring safety signage, according to Queensland’s Department of Environment and Science.

A spokesman for the department added fines could be levelled retrospectively using social media as evidence.

‘Queensland Park and Wildlife Service also has a close relationship with First Nations peoples, commercial operators, visitor information centres and tour guides who assist in discouraging visitors from going over safety barriers,’ the spokesman said. 

She said the Carnarvon Gorge was made from a porous sandstone, which meant visitors risked falling to their death as a result of cliff collapse 

 

 

Source link

Loading...

Leave a Reply

High street bookmaker gags problem gambler with £100k payout

Woman caught on camera outside wedding venue before stealing newlywed couple’s gifts