in

Sir Paul McCartney 'had his shoelaces tied by an aid before he performed at Glastonbury'

Sir Paul McCartney had one of his assistants crouch down and tie his shoelaces before he performed at Glastonbury… because he had a bad back.

The Beatles rocker, 78, is said to have had some help by the aid ahead of his set at Worthy Farm in 2004.

Black Eyed Peas star Will.I.Am, who also played at the festival that year, revealed he saw the interaction happen while standing at the side of the stage.

Not so rock and roll: Paul McCartney had an assistant tie his shoelaces for him before getting on stage at Glastonbury in 2004 because he had a bad back (pictured during the festival)

Not so rock and roll: Paul McCartney had an assistant tie his shoelaces for him before getting on stage at Glastonbury in 2004 because he had a bad back (pictured during the festival)

Speaking in an interview with Zane Lowe, Will.I.Am said: ‘As he was going on, somebody tied his shoe. I was like, “what he can’t tie his own shoes?”.  

Everything then became clearer as he was told Sir Paul had a bad back at the time and Will understood that he needed someone to help him out. 

MailOnline has contacted representatives for Sir Paul for a comment.

During the interview Will.I.Am went on to say that he doesn’t like it when celebrities are pampered and don’t do things for themselves, reports The Mirror.

Will said: ‘Success f***s people up like that. It makes you think you’re the centre of the world.’ 

Ouch: Will.I.Am watched the aid help Sir Paul out with his shoes but was confused before being told that the rocker was suffering from an ailment (pictured in September 2019)

Ouch: Will.I.Am watched the aid help Sir Paul out with his shoes but was confused before being told that the rocker was suffering from an ailment (pictured in September 2019) 

At Glastonbury in 2004 Sir Paul was among a number of big names on the lineup, with bands Muse and Oasis also taking to the stage.

James Brown, Joss Stone, and Franz Ferdinand also performed to the 150,000 people who attended the musical weekend and tickets only cost £112. 

It comes after Sir Paul revealed he found it ‘pretty hurtful’ when he was blamed for breaking up The Beatles when the group parted ways in 1970.

Reflecting on the misconceptions he faced during his time with the band, the singer spoke candidly with British GQ about how he felt at the time.

Opinion: The singer went on to say that he doesn't like it when celebrities are pampered and don't do things for themselves (Will.I.Am is pictured in June 2019)

Opinion: The singer went on to say that he doesn’t like it when celebrities are pampered and don’t do things for themselves (Will.I.Am is pictured in June 2019)

Saying people believed the band – which also consisted of John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr – ‘hated each other’ after their split, Sir Paul clarified that the group simply had ‘disputes’ like any other family would. 

Of common misconceptions, he said: ‘I suppose that when The Beatles broke up, perhaps there was a misconception that we all sort of hated each other. 

‘What I realise now is that, because it was a family, because it was a gang, families argue. And families have disputes. And some people want to do this and some people want to do that. 

‘So I think what came about after that … the only way for me to save The Beatles and Apple – and to release Get Back by Peter Jackson and which allowed us to release Anthology and all these great remasters of all the great Beatles records – was to sue the band. 








Struggle: Sir Paul recently revealed he found it 'pretty hurtful' when he was blamed for breaking up The Beatles when the group parted ways in 1970 (pictured in 1967)

Struggle: Sir Paul recently revealed he found it ‘pretty hurtful’ when he was blamed for breaking up The Beatles when the group parted ways in 1970 (pictured in 1967)

‘If I hadn’t done that, it would have all belonged to Allen Klein. The only way I was given to get us out of that was to do what I did. 

‘I said “Well, I’ll sue Allen Klein,” and I wasn’t told I couldn’t because he wasn’t party to it. “You’ve got to sue the Beatles.”‘

Sir Paul’s decision led to tensions between the former members, with John even writing his song How Do You Sleep? which overtly referenced his former band mate, creating even more ‘hurtful’ misconceptions.

‘I remember reading an article, an interview with Yoko, who, OK, she was a big John supporter, I get that, but in this article she goes, “Paul did nothing. All he ever did was book studio,” Sir Paul continued.

Looking back: During his candid GQ interview, Sir Paul clarified that the group simply had 'disputes' like any other family would (pictured in 1963)

Looking back: During his candid GQ interview, Sir Paul clarified that the group simply had ‘disputes’ like any other family would (pictured in 1963)

‘And I’m going, “Err? No…” And then John does this famous song, How Do You Sleep?, and he’s going, “All you ever did was ‘Yesterday”… And I’m going, “No, man.”

‘But then you hear the stories from various angles and apparently people who were in the room when John was writing that, he was getting suggestions for the lyrics off Allen Klein. 

‘So, you see the atmosphere of “Let’s get Paul. Let’s nail him in a song…” And those things were pretty hurtful.’

During their time together, The Beatles became one of the most influential bands of all time with their releases making them the best-selling music act of all time. 








Source link

Everything you need to know about Shark Week 2020

United flight at Newark is evacuated on the tarmac after 'a passenger made a bomb threat on board'