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Students at St Aloysius College in Milsons Point caught up in muck-up day controversy

Another prestigious Sydney school has been embroiled in muck-up day controversy with students allegedly found to be planning a spate of ‘criminal’ pranks. 

Students at St Aloysius College in Milsons Point, on Sydney’s lower North Shore, are the latest to be told they could be expelled or face police action after plans for end of year celebrations were uncovered.

The elite school’s rector, Father Ross Jones and Principal Mark Tannock sent an email to all Year 12 students and their parents at the all-boys school condemning the plans.

Some of the challenges at the $20,000-a-year school were labelled as ‘inappropriate and concerning activities’. 

Year 12 students St Aloysius College (pictured) in Milsons Point on Sydney's lower North Shore, were found to be engaging in 'very inappropriate and concerning activities' on September 25

Year 12 students St Aloysius College (pictured) in Milsons Point on Sydney’s lower North Shore, were found to be engaging in ‘very inappropriate and concerning activities’ on September 25

The elite school's rector, Father Ross Jones and Principal Mark Tannock sent an email (pictured) to all year 12 students and their parents condemning the disgusting behaviour

The elite school’s rector, Father Ross Jones and Principal Mark Tannock sent an email (pictured) to all year 12 students and their parents condemning the disgusting behaviour

‘In particular, we have been made aware of an overnight competition that invites criminal, manifestly dangerous, and highly offensive behaviours (a number of which are acutely sexist in nature),’ the St Aloysius’ leaders wrote, The Sydney Morning Herald reported. 

The pair said the boys should not be excused for their actions under the belief that ‘boys will be boys’.

‘Clearly, if any student should engage in these activities, the College will have no hesitation in contacting the police and then banning him from the College for the remainder of 2020.

‘This will include the voluntary study programs, the Valete Dinner and the Year 12 Formal. Furthermore, it will mean he will be required to sit the HSC examinations as an independent candidate at another examination centre.’

After the initial email was sent out, Mr Tannock (pictured) said some students came forward and apologised for getting involved

After the initial email was sent out, Mr Tannock (pictured) said some students came forward and apologised for getting involved 

After the email was sent out, some students came forward and apologised for getting involved in the activities. 

‘Yes, these young men have made a serious error of judgment,’ Mr Tannock wrote in another email, The Daily Telegraph reported.

‘However, we expect them to grow and learn as a result of our forgiveness and their reflection.’

The strict warning to students at St Aloysius comes after Pymble Ladies College, on Sydney’s north shore, also warned its pupils about their muck-up day plans.

A document allegedly circulated among students at the all-girls school encouraged them to ‘swallow a goldfish’, ‘streak down a highway’ and to even ‘have sex with someone’s dad’ as part of a graduation challenge.

Many of the challenges in the document believed to be associated with the $33,000-a-year school were sexual or criminal in nature.

Students would be split into teams and would gain points for every task they could prove they had completed. 

Graduating students at elite private girls' school Pymble Ladies' College (pictured), on Sydney's north shore, allegedly created a vulgar muck-up day challenge

Graduating students at elite private girls’ school Pymble Ladies’ College (pictured), on Sydney’s north shore, allegedly created a vulgar muck-up day challenge 

Some of the alleged challenges by the students at Pymble encouraged girls to 'have sex with someone's dad' and 'eat someone's vomit'

Some of the alleged challenges by the students at Pymble encouraged girls to ‘have sex with someone’s dad’ and ‘eat someone’s vomit’

A spokesperson for the school said students would face punishment for carrying out the muck-up day plan, 7NEWS reported.  

‘We are horrified and disappointed that any student would have their name associated with what was apparently a competitive list between students at a number of schools,’ they said.

A similar scavenger hunt was also organised as part of a muck-up challenge for the elite Shore School on Sydney’s lower north shore. 

The ‘official rule and challenge book’ – created by students in a PDF document – revealed they planned to meet between 5pm and 6pm on Wednesday at Waverton Park for the series of ‘treacherous’ challenges. 

The 'Scavenger Hunt' required girls to divide into teams and perform a variety of sexual and illegal acts in order to score points (Pymble Ladies' College pictured)

The ‘Scavenger Hunt’ required girls to divide into teams and perform a variety of sexual and illegal acts in order to score points (Pymble Ladies’ College pictured)

The school leavers would then be split into teams of five or six before carrying out a series of tasks to compete for points.  

The rule book stated all participants from the $33,000-a-year school were required to chip in $10 and the team who gathers the most points would be awarded the total cash prize.   

Before starting the challenges, the groups would be required to finish a case of 30 beers in 15 minutes.

The competitors would then be given seven hours of ‘hunting’ from 6pm to 1am. 

There were more than 150 challenges listed in the scavenger hunt rule book and the tasks range in difficulty.   

Students from elite private boys' school Shore, in Sydney's lower north shore, also attempted to complete a controversial challenge named the 'Triwizard Shorenament' (pictured)

Students from elite private boys’ school Shore, in Sydney’s lower north shore, also attempted to complete a controversial challenge named the ‘Triwizard Shorenament’ (pictured)

The school is among the top ranked in New South Wales and regularly features impressive Year 12 results

The school is among the top ranked in New South Wales and regularly features impressive Year 12 results








One challenge called the ‘Pakistan Sacrifice’ read: ‘Eat two laxatives and a Phaal Curry (spicy curry) from Lavender Bay Curry. 

‘Warning: Will be s***ing all night and probably will want to die.’

Another challenge was dubbed the ‘trifecta spit’ which included a ‘spit roast’, spitting on a homeless man and jumping off the Spit Bridge.

For 10,000 points, students could ‘get on a plane to Melbourne’.  

There were more than 150 challenges listed in the scavenger hunt rule book and the tasks ranged in difficulty. The 'Beta' difficulty (pictured) was deemed the easiest for competitors, with five to ten points up for grabs for each task

There were more than 150 challenges listed in the scavenger hunt rule book and the tasks ranged in difficulty. The ‘Beta’ difficulty (pictured) was deemed the easiest for competitors, with five to ten points up for grabs for each task

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