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Ted refuses to leave the grave of his best friend Tippy who died after eating poison in Queensland

A farmer who was forced to bury two of his beloved dogs after they died from eating poisoned bait has captured the heartbreaking moment his loyal puppy Ted lay on top of the grave site and refused to move.   

Ted, a nine-week-old Maremma puppy, lived on the Green Acres Hobby Farm in Moolboolaman, near Gin Gin, in Queensland with fellow dogs Tippy and Fay. 

The fluffy little pup loved the older dogs and followed the pair everywhere they went.

He was left devastated when both died suddenly of suspected 1080 poisoning on August 31. 

A farmer has captured the heartbreaking moment his puppy named Ted refused to leave the his best friends grave site after their sudden death

A farmer has captured the heartbreaking moment his puppy named Ted refused to leave the his best friends grave site after their sudden death

Ted (pictured with Tippy), a nine-week-old Maremma puppy, lived on the Green Acres Hobby Farm in Moolboolaman, near Gin Gin, in Queensland with fellow dogs Tippy and Fay

Ted (pictured with Tippy), a nine-week-old Maremma puppy, lived on the Green Acres Hobby Farm in Moolboolaman, near Gin Gin, in Queensland with fellow dogs Tippy and Fay

Ted and Tippy (pictured) would play together all the time, owner Pat Jackson said they were 'best buddies'

Ted and Tippy (pictured) would play together all the time, owner Pat Jackson said they were ‘best buddies’

Owner Greg Jackson had found Tippy screaming in agony early that morning. 

Before he had a chance to even call for help the two-year-old Border collie kelpie cross was dead. 

Mr Jackson called his wife Pat moments later in tears to break the news.

‘In 47 years of marriage I had never heard my husband sound so distressed, sobbing and crying,’ Mrs Jackson said. 

Hours later, when Mr Jackson returned home from an appointment, he found seven-year-old Fay laying stiff with her mouth wide open. She had died too.

Their sudden passing shocked the couple. 

Mr Jackson chose to bury both loyal working dogs side by side on their property. 

The couple got Ted so he could be mentored by Fay, who is a seven-year-old livestock guardian dog

The couple got Ted so he could be mentored by Fay, who is a seven-year-old livestock guardian dog

Mr Jackson chose to bury both loyal working dogs side by side on their property

Mr Jackson chose to bury both loyal working dogs side by side on their property

But once the grave was covered tiny Ted refused to leave. 

The small pup lay down on the patch of dirt looking downcast.  

‘Greg had to literally pick him up and put him into the car to take him home,’ Mrs Jackson said.

‘The pup, we got him so he could be mentored by Fay because she was getting on in years, Fay was not in a playful mood, but him and Tippy just played together all the time. They were great buddies.’ 

Two weeks on and the family is still struggling with their loss. 

‘It’s tough we’re having our moments still,’ Mrs Jackson said. 

‘Ted’s going quite well, really happy little dog, you can see he;s probably missing his playmates.’

Two weeks on and the family is still struggling with their loss. 'It's tough we're having our moments still,' Mrs Jackson said (Pictured: Mrs Jackson with Tippy)

Two weeks on and the family is still struggling with their loss. ‘It’s tough we’re having our moments still,’ Mrs Jackson said (Pictured: Mrs Jackson with Tippy)

Mr Jackson had to pick up tiny ted who refused to leave the grave site of his best friends

Mr Jackson had to pick up tiny ted who refused to leave the grave site of his best friends

The couple suspect the dogs died after eating sodium fluoroacetate, commonly known by its brand name of 1080.

The chemical is a highly toxic pesticide used to kill pests, including feral dogs, foxes, cats, rabbits, pigs, and in some cases, native wildlife. 

However, it is easily ingested as it is odourless, tasteless and colourless. 

The Jacksons don’t know how the chemical got onto their property but believe a bird may have dropped it.

The couple is now calling for 1080 to be banned in Australia. 

The chemical is a highly toxic pesticide used to kill pests, including feral dogs, foxes, cats, rabbits, pigs, and in some cases, native wildlife. 

However, it is easily ingested as it is odourless, tasteless and colourless. 

‘Even with the feral dogs it’s a cruel and painful death,’ Mrs Jackson said. 

A petition launched calling for an investigation into the dog’s deaths amassed more than 2,000 signatures in less than two days.

Across Australia, people must have a permit to place baits, and there must be notification in the areas where they can be found. 

WHAT IS 1080? 

1080 is used for poisoning wild dogs and other predators

It comes in the form of a white powder

It’s added to fresh or dry animal baits

It’s only available in Australia to those who are authorised to use it

After digestion of 1080, most dogs and foxes will die in up to two hours

The central nervous system becomes effected which leads to unconsciousness. 

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