in

The clever app helping thousands of tradies earn extra cash after being crushed by the pandemic

Tradesmen who have been forced out of work amid the coronavirus pandemic are turning to a clever new app to secure some extra cash. 

WorkApp was originally created to make life easier for tradesmen looking to hire casual workers in their area. 

But since the coronavirus pandemic hit Australia’s shore, the app has taken off, with  thousands of workers downloading it every day, hoping to use the free platform to find a job, or connect with buyers or sellers nearby.

Clare Horder, 24, was among the thousands of workers who saw their hours diminish as a result of the uncertainty of crisis.

The construction landscaper turned to WorkApp as a way of find new clients and managed to pick up extra odd jobs to help her out too.

‘When this coronavirus thing came up we sort of had to look for an alternative,’ she said.

Before COVID hit, Ms Horder relied on word of mouth to find work, but as that dried up she discovered the app which connected to a bigger pool of possible clients.

Clare Horder, 24, was among the thousands of workers who saw their hours diminish as a result of the uncertainty of crisis

Clare Horder, 24, was among the thousands of workers who saw their hours diminish as a result of the uncertainty of crisis

The construction landscaper turned to WorkApp as a way of find new clients and managed to pick up extra odd jobs to help her out too

The construction landscaper turned to WorkApp as a way of find new clients and managed to pick up extra odd jobs to help her out too

‘It covers more area or more people, it’s a lot quicker to get the word out, being an online community, it does make it a lot easier. 

‘We wake up with a notification letting us know someone wants a job or someone looking for a job and then connect with them. 

She said she has been ‘very busy’ since discovering the app and has been working about six days a week. 

Nathan Chamings, who owns building company AMB Homes, was forced to turn to the app when Victoria’s second wave struck.

Mr Chamings is based in Albury–Wodonga, on the New South Wales and Victoria border.

The border closure on July 8 put a lot of pressure on his business. 

‘That sent a bit of a shock-wave through the industry in this area. 

‘It hit us generally pretty hard in regards that people didn’t want to spend money. people weren’t sure how it was going to affect us,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

Nathan Chamings, who owns building company AMB Homes, was forced to turn to the app when Victoria's second wave struck

Nathan Chamings, who owns building company AMB Homes, was forced to turn to the app when Victoria’s second wave struck

Construction workers build a new park in the central business district in Melbourne on August 6, before strict limits were imposed by the state government

Construction workers build a new park in the central business district in Melbourne on August 6, before strict limits were imposed by the state government

‘It had everyone on standby, it was particularly tough being on a border town.’

Mr Chamings found himself in a tough spot, with his livelihood hanging on the line.

‘You’re trying to keep employees in business as well.’ 

How WorkApp works? 

WorkApp is a free platform that allows users to buy/sell/rent almost anything.

Workers or companies can post free ads, classifieds and promotions. 

The app uses a special ‘refresh’ technology which allows users to boost their listing to the top of search results with the press of a button. 

There is no commission, no cost for listings and no limit on the number of times listings can be refreshed. 

He turned to WorkApp which helped him secure casual laborers to help with jobs  outside the border.

‘Trying to find trades when you don’t know the area is a bit more difficult. 

Looking forward he was cautiously optimistic about what the future holds. 

‘I think November/December next year could be slower…it is an unknown, we just take it day by day. What is in the future we don’t know.’

WorkApp founder Shane Wallace said the company has been helping the industry by providing financial relief to businesses that simply can’t afford to absorb the costs of job ads or commissions on sales as well as helping individuals keen to earn some extra cash.

‘The digital landscape continues to change the way we do almost everything, and it’s these platforms people turn to in turbulent times.

‘WorkApp takes buying, selling, connecting and communicating to a level playing field by removing the power to influence a ‘search’ from leading corporations and giving it to the people, at no cost.

‘It acknowledges that the best worker for your job could be just around the corner. There’s no expensive middle man. We connect people directly and then leave them to get on with business.’

The app uses a special ‘refresh’ technology which allows users to boost their listing to the top of search results with the press of a button. 

There is no commission, no cost for listings and no limit on the number of times listings can be refreshed.

New figures show the construction industry plunged by almost seven per cent during the second wave. Pictured: construction workers in Melbourne in August

New figures show the construction industry plunged by almost seven per cent during the second wave. Pictured: construction workers in Melbourne in August

Initial restrictions only allowed workers to visit one construction site per week during lockdowns. Pictured: A construction worker wearing a face mask on July 22 in Melbourne

Initial restrictions only allowed workers to visit one construction site per week during lockdowns. Pictured: A construction worker wearing a face mask on July 22 in Melbourne

For example, if someone is looking for some casual work or jobs, they can refresh their profile each morning and go to the top of the list for anyone looking to hire in their area.

A report released by consulting firm Taylor Fry revealed that employment levels across all industries in Victoria had fallen by 7.7 per cent since March when the pandemic began in Australia. 

Construction held up comparatively well during the initial lockdown, with employment dropping by 4.5 per cent.

But new figures show the industry plunged by almost seven per cent during the second wave, with Victoria now under draconian restrictions that have severely cut activity on building sites. 

Taylor Fry principal Alan Greenfield told the Australian Financial Review  the nosedive was due to tougher restrictions.

‘Pre-pandemic, construction jobs accounted for about nine per cent of all jobs in Victoria, making it the state’s fourth-largest employer,’ Mr Greenfield said. 

‘The closure of hardware stores and restriction on the number of workers allowed on work sites is taking its toll.’

The capacity restrictions were imposed in early August, leaving tradesmen across the state fearful about their mortgages and providing for their families.

‘I’ve got no job on Monday, we’ll see how it goes… I’ve got a mortgage, kids, the whole lot’ one tradie told A Current Affair.

‘The big dog upstairs [Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews] just letting us down once again, he’s useless.’ 

Source link

iOS 14 – 17 Settings You NEED to Change Immediately!

Curtis Scott arrest: NSW Police commissioner Mick Fuller defends cops who tasered the NRL player