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Thousands of British tourists may be ignoring 14-day quarantine rules after returning to UK

Thousands of Brits across the country may be flouting quarantine rules and not self-isolating after returning from trips abroad.  

The Metropolitan Police has received more than 1,000 referrals to carry out quarantine checks to make sure that returned holidaymakers are self-isolating.  

And experts have warned that if Brits don’t stick to the rules laid out by the Government then a country-wide lockdown could well be enforced. 

Requests for ‘further action’ have been raised by Border Force officials and Public Health England. 

It comes after Boris Johnson yesterday defied a huge Tory backlash to insist coronavirus testing on arrival at airports would only give a ‘false sense of security’. 

MPs voiced frustration as Mr Johnson again poured cold water on the idea, despite desperate pleas to reform the Government’s blanket travel quarantine policy in order to prevent the ‘demise’ of the aviation sector. 

Thousands of Brits across the country may be flouting quarantine rules and not self-isolating after trips abroad. Pictured: Travellers arriving at Heathrow airport on August 22

Thousands of Brits across the country may be flouting quarantine rules and not self-isolating after trips abroad. Pictured: Travellers arriving at Heathrow airport on August 22

A professor of environmental engineering at Leeds University and a member of the government’s Sage (Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies) committee warned that the UK is at a pivotal point. 

Catherine Noakes told The Guardian: ‘We are at a point where there’s a risk that wider transmission of Covid could increase again. 

Transmission depends of the amount of contact between people, and with schools and universities returning and many more people going back to work, the level of interactions in communities is likely to increase.’ 

The stern warning came as it was revealed that a further 1,940 people were infected with coronavirus as of yesterday – the highest daily number since May. 

And Boris Johnson yesterday defied a huge Tory backlash to insist coronavirus testing on arrival at airports would only give a ‘false sense of security’.  

The Metropolitan Police has received more than 1,000 referrals to carry out quarantine checks to make sure that returned holidaymakers are self-isolating. Pictured: Travellers arriving at Heathrow airport on August 22

The Metropolitan Police has received more than 1,000 referrals to carry out quarantine checks to make sure that returned holidaymakers are self-isolating. Pictured: Travellers arriving at Heathrow airport on August 22

The Metropolitan police told The Guardian it had received more than 1,000 referrals since the beginning of August for quarantine checks to be carried out.

Officers have so far visited 840 people who should be quarantining after returning from abroad. They are planning to visit another 301 travellers who have recently returned.  

Greater Manchester police said its officers had received 263 quarantine referrals. 

And officers said they had also issued two fixed penalty notices in relation to people repeatedly breaching the self-isolation regulations.

Ms Noakes added: ‘It’s crucial that we don’t allow cases to rise so we can avoid more widespread restrictions again. This means that people should keep maintaining social distance, washing hands, wearing a face covering in indoor public spaces and making sure that shared spaces in buildings are well ventilated.’

And experts have warned that if Brits don't stick to the rules laid out by the Government then a country-wide lockdown could well be enforced. Pictured: A traveller arrives at Heathrow airport on August 22

And experts have warned that if Brits don’t stick to the rules laid out by the Government then a country-wide lockdown could well be enforced. Pictured: A traveller arrives at Heathrow airport on August 22

A member of Sage, who asked not to be named, told The Guardian that they were unsure why the UK hasn’t yet seen a spike in cases like France or Spain but guessed it would probably come soon.

 They said: ‘I would say that it is pivotal. We either go into the winter in a position where we feel confident that we have this problem on a string or where it is still a wild beast which we can’t control. I suspect it’s the latter.’  

MPs voiced frustration as Mr Johnson again poured cold water on the idea of testing holidaymakers as they return in airports, despite desperate pleas to reform the Government’s blanket travel quarantine policy in order to prevent the ‘demise’ of the aviation sector.

The premier said Public Health England believed only seven per cent of cases could be caught by screening people on arrival. 

Speaking during a visit to a HS2 site in Solihull, he said he understood the ‘difficulties’ faced by the air industry but the 14 day self isolation requirement remained ‘vital’.

WHAT ARE THE QUARANTINE RULES? 

Anyone entering England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland from somewhere that is not on that country’s list of exempt travel corridors must go into self-isolation for 14 days. 

You can’t get round the rules by using a different airport.

Everyone entering the UK, including British nationals, must fill in a ‘passenger locator’ form and provide their contact details and UK address. 

If someone who is required to self-isolate does not provide an address, the government will arrange accommodation at the traveller’s expense. 

For 14 days, starting from the day after arrival, people who are quarantining should not:

Go to work, school, or public areas.

Have visitors, except for essential support.

Go out to buy food, or other essentials, if they can rely on others to do this for them.

Use taxis or public transport to reach their destination on arrival in the UK, if possible. 

The quarantine rules apply to everyone apart from selected groups of people such as freight drivers, very regular business travellers, and politicians or other dignitaries.  

A No10 spokesman added: ‘Testing at the border does not work to catch people who may go on to get the virus.’

But Conservative MP Henry Smith, who chairs the all-party group on aviation, pointed out that other major countries such as Germany and France were already introducing testing at airports. He said the government could not allow the UK to be at a ‘competitive disadvantage’.  

A growing band of Tory rebels are hoping that airport testing could be the next in a string of government policy U-turns. In a potential chink of light, Grant Shapps today admitted that the move could halve the 14-day quarantine period. 

While he stressed routine screening was not a ‘silver bullet’, Mr Shapps suggested that it could be a way of reducing the restrictions on travellers from higher-infection countries.  

The comments came as the Cabinet minister conceded that the government’s  quarantine rules are causing ‘confusion’, after England kept Portugal on the safe list – despite Scotland and Wales imposing curbs.

Amid rising anger from bewildered holidaymakers that the system amounts to ‘roulette’, the he said starkly different approaches within the UK were a problem.

But he insisted that the Westminster government had assessed the best evidence and concluded that Portugal was still low-risk, and swiped at Scotland for decreeing that travellers from Greece must self-isolate this week before even seeing the latest data. 

The desperate defence came amid growing evidence that the public is losing patience with the regime. An exclusive poll for MailOnline by Redfield & Wilton Strategies found just 24 per cent believe it is working, while 48 per cent say it is not.

Around a third want more countries added to the list of exempt countries.

Mr Johnson said quarantine measures for arrivals from countries deemed high-risk must remain ‘a vital part’ of the fight against coronavirus.

Asked during a visit to Solihull, he said he understands ‘the difficulties’ the airline industry is going through but said testing at points of entry only identifies 7 per cent of the cases.

‘So 93 per cent of the time you could have a real false sense of security, a false sense of confidence when you arrive and take a test,’ he said.

‘That’s why the quarantine system that we have has got to be an important part of our repertoire, of our toolbox, in fighting Covid.

‘What we don’t want to see is reinfection coming in from abroad and quarantine is a vital part of that.’  

Mr Smith said testing had to be part of the solution to easing quarantine. ‘Countries like Germany, France quite a few others are testing,’ he said. 

‘We are at a competitive disadvantage. Testing also means there is greater confidence for people to travel, and also greater confidence in terms of public health.

‘I think it is the answer. I am a little bit frustrated that the government don’t seem to be there yet,’ 

He added: ‘It seems to be effective. Obviously nothing is foolproof.’








Mr Smith said Heathrow had suggested a two-test process with a five-day quarantine.

Challenged on the demands for airports testing from across the industry, Mr Shapps told Sky News: ‘I know that airport testing is one of those things that sounds so logical. You come in, you get a test, perhaps one of these very quick test and you are free not to quarantine,’ he said.

‘The problem we have, and this is what I am working with airports on at the moment, and the industry, is that a day zero test as you get home is unlikely to find the vast majority of people who have travelled with coronavirus but are asymptomatic…

‘There are arguments about this, but PHE say that would perhaps pick up just seven per cent of people who are in fact positive, and allow those people to sort of go off.

‘So you probably have to have some kind of quarantine period in here, perhaps seven or eight days, maybe a test then.

‘But these are the things that we are working through at the moment.’ 

Britain has recorded another 13 coronavirus deaths today

Britain has recorded another 13 coronavirus deaths today

 During his round of interviews, Mr Shapps said there was an ‘argument’ for judging islands separately from mainland countries. ‘I think there is an argument for regionalising it… but having said that… actually the islands (in Spain) now wouldn’t be fine.

‘But it is fluid and I do accept there is space to look at those types of things.’ 

Expectations had been growing for days that Portugal would be added to the quarantine roll this week after the total weekly cases per 100,000 of population rose above the UK’s trigger threshold of 20.

Mr Shapps had previously indicated that this was the main metric the government would look at to impose restrictions. But last night, he announced that there would be no change – pointing out that the proportion of tests coming back positive still remained low.

The move left some holidaymakers complaining that they had been forced to come home early unnecessarily to avoid quarantine, while others had stayed on and were caught out by the change in the nations.  

WHAT ARE THE QUARANTINE RULES? 

A paper produced by Public Health England estimated that testing people when they cross a border could be a successful way of stopping the virus being imported, and particularly if they were tested twice.

The study, presented to the Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) in June, said testing could slash the need for quarantine after international flights.

It said that if people were tested on landing and then released from quarantine after two days it would catch 85 per cent of cases, The Independent reported.

This, however, would mean 15 of every 100 infected travellers would get ‘false negative’ results and slip through the net.

Double-testing – once on arrival and then once after eight days of isolation – would catch 96 per cent.

In that scenario only four out of 100 people carrying the virus would get through the system. 

And it would still mean quarantine could be shortened from the current two weeks to just one. 

Timing the tests is important because if it is done too soon after someone has caught the virus, they may not have a substantial enough infection for a test to be able to pick it up. 

It can take a few days for the virus to really take hold and become detectable. This is called the ‘incubation period’ and people do not generally feel ill during this time so are silent carriers. The average incubation period for Covid-19 is thought to be five days.

PHE said: ‘Double testing of travellers significantly reduces the risk of false negatives, and could enable quarantine duration of less than 14 days.

‘The optimal days of testing are between days five and eight post-exposure’. 

The Cabinet minister took thinly-veiled swipes at Wales and Scotland for their action today.  

Scotland and Wales are imposing 14 days of isolation on arrivals from Portugal. Scotland is also including Greece on its quarantine list, while Wales added seven Greek islands.

Mr Shapps told Sky News: ‘I do realise it creates confusion for people not to have a single rule, but we do have this devolved approach throughout the United Kingdom and I can only be responsible for the English part of that.’

He said that Welsh ministers ‘had not perhaps noticed or seen’ that the proportion of positive tests had fallen in Portugal, as the overall number of tests were up.

And Mr Shapps claimed that Scotland had taken steps against Greece earlier this week without waiting to see the latest data from the Joint Biosecurity Centre. 

He said the UK Government’s review concluded no changes were necessary partly because test positivity in Portugal came down while the number of cases overall in Greece had fallen.

‘If you test more people, of course your number of positives per 100,000 would be more just as a product of having tested more people,’ he said.

‘We don’t want to penalise a country for doing the right thing, what we’re additionally interested in is how many of those tests were actually positive.  

‘So it’s getting that and in addition how it’s been treated, how fast it’s moving and whether the government in that country has a plan in place and many other factors that have to do with it.’

Ms Shapps said testing at airports is not a ‘silver bullet solution’ to end quarantining and the ‘vast majority’ of asymptomatic cases would not be detected by one test alone. 

But he told Sky News they were not ‘ignoring’ calls for testing at airports – and it could potentially slash the quarantine period in half. 

‘I know that airport testing is one of those things that sounds so logical. You come in, you get a test, perhaps one of these very quick test and you are free not to quarantine,’ he said.

‘The problem we have, and this is what I am working with airports on at the moment, and the industry, is that a day zero test as you get home is unlikely to find the vast majority of people who have travelled with coronavirus but are asymptomatic…

‘There are arguments about this, but PHE say that would perhaps pick up just seven per cent of people who are in fact positive, and allow those people to sort of go off.

‘So you probably have to have some kind of quarantine period in here, perhaps seven or eight days, maybe a test then.

‘But these are the things that we are working through at the moment.’

The UK's key metric for introducing quarantine is how many cases a country has had in total over the past week, adjusted to per 100,000 of population. Spain and France are still well above the level, while Portugal has also crept over it

 The UK’s key metric for introducing quarantine is how many cases a country has had in total over the past week, adjusted to per 100,000 of population. Spain and France are still well above the level, while Portugal has also crept over it

Portugal has been above the trigger threshold for UK quarantine measures for the past few days - but Grant Shapps said they were also looking at the proportion of tests that come back positive, and that had fallen

Portugal has been above the trigger threshold for UK quarantine measures for the past few days – but Grant Shapps said they were also looking at the proportion of tests that come back positive, and that had fallen 

Scotland and Wales have imposed restrictions on Greece, even though the case rates are still relatively low

Scotland and Wales have imposed restrictions on Greece, even though the case rates are still relatively low

Mr Shapps also said there was an ‘argument’ for judging islands separately from mainland countries. ‘I think there is an argument for regionalising it… but having said that… actually the islands (in Spain) now wouldn’t be fine.

‘But it is fluid and I do accept there is space to look at those types of things.’

There had been speculation that Westminster would reimpose the requirement on Portugal due to a spike in Covid-19 cases, leading many holidaymakers to pay hundreds of pounds to fly home this week. 

In Wales, the need to isolate for 14 days when arriving from Portugal, Gibraltar and seven Greek islands came into force at 4am on Friday.

How Germany has nearly DOUBLED its testing rate to screen thousands of returning air passengers

While Britain continues to hold out against introducing coronavirus tests at airports, Germany has nearly doubled its testing rate to screen thousands of passengers returning from Covid-19 hotspots abroad.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps insisted today that testing at airports was not a ‘silver bullet solution’ after the UK’s quarantine policy was thrown into confusion when Portugal was unexpectedly kept on the ‘travel corridor’ list.

But in Germany, which has won plaudits for its testing programme since the start of the pandemic, travellers from high-risk areas have been getting free, compulsory coronavirus tests since August 8.

Germany’s busiest airport in Frankfurt has carried out more than 120,000 tests – with passengers exempted from a 14-day quarantine if they test negative.

Results are generally delivered to passengers within three days, with some airports promising them within 24 hours or even on the same day.

Mandatory tests will be dropped as the summer ends, but the recent resurgence in cases is already showing signs of slowing in Germany, in contrast to Spain and France where they are continuing to mount.

In Scotland, passengers arriving from Portugal will have to quarantine from 4am on Saturday, as well as those arriving from French Polynesia.

Scotland began requiring travellers from anywhere in Greece to enter quarantine from Thursday.

There were 23 Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people in Portugal in the seven days to Wednesday, up from 15.3 a week earlier.

A seven-day rate of 20 is the threshold above which the UK Government has considered triggering quarantine conditions.

Industry leaders and holidaymakers criticised the Government, saying travellers are ‘totally confused’ by the different approaches in Westminster and the devolved administrations. Critics have labelled the system ‘quarantine roulette’. 

Kelly Jones and her family changed their flights home from the Algarve from Saturday to Friday at a cost of £900 to avoid a potential quarantine, because she did not want her children to miss two weeks of school.

The 45-year-old from Birmingham said the situation was ‘absolutely disgusting’, telling the PA news agency: ‘The Government just change the goalposts left, right and centre at the moment. It’s embarrassing.’

Paul Charles, chief executive of travel consultancy the PC Agency, said: ‘The quarantine policy is in tatters and dividing the United Kingdom.

‘Consumers are totally confused by the different approaches and it’s impossible to understand the Government’s own criteria any more on when to add or remove a country.’

It came as figures showed the number of close contacts of people who tested positive for Covid-19 being reached through Test and Trace was at its lowest since the system was launched.

Thursday also saw the highest daily total of virus cases since June 4, with 1,735 positive results in the 24 hours to 9am. 

It comes as it was revealed that Leeds is teetering on the brink and has been added to Public Health England’s list of areas of concern.  

The Yorkshire city, home to half a million people, has seen its infection rate rise to 32.4 new cases per 100,000 people, bringing it to the attention of authorities.

One in every 29 people who gets tested there – 3.5 per cent – is testing positive, according to official data.

Recent Sage documents have revealed that scientists told ministers it was ‘highly likely’ there would be significant outbreaks of Covid-19 at universities this term. 

And they added that infected students could well cause outbreaks across the UK.  

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