in

Viral stripper Tanqueray recalls how a madame summoned her to Alfred Bloomingdale's hotel room

A former New York City stripper who delighted social media users with wild tales from her life last year is back on the Humans of New York Instagram account with even more incredible stories — including the time she allegedly fulfilled a ‘black maid’ fantasy for department store heir Alfred Bloomingdale, her flirtation with one of The Temptations, and her sassy comeback for an angry James Brown.

In November of 2019, Tanqueray — whose real name is Stephanie — became one of the most buzzed-about subjects in Humans of New York history after photographer Brandon Stanton featured her on the account and gave her a chance to share her experiences, from making costumes for porn stars to wearing stolen designer clothes to punishing a fellow stripper with itching powder in her G-string.

Now Tanqueray, 76, is back on the account for a 32-part series being published this week, in which she has detailed some her craziest stories, including the moment she says she fled Alfred Bloomingdale’s hotel room when he tried to hit her with a belt.

Viral hit: Last November, Humans of New York shared the story of a former stripper who went by the name Tanqueray

Viral hit: Last November, Humans of New York shared the story of a former stripper who went by the name Tanqueray

More stories: Now Tanqueray, 76, is back on the account for a 32-part series being published this week

More stories: Now Tanqueray, 76, is back on the account for a 32-part series being published this week

Tanqueray captured the attention of social media users last fall, when creator Brandon Stanton photographed her on the street and gave her an outlet to share her stories. 

Stanton — whose book Humans comes out October 6 — went on to get her entire life story in a series of interviews.

More stories: Stanton's book Humans comes out October 6

More stories: Stanton’s book Humans comes out October 6

Now, he said, ‘Stephanie’s health has taken a bad turn,’ so he’s sharing her story and raising money for her care on GoFundMe. So far, the fund has raised over $800,000.

In the most recent posts in the series, Tanqueray has shared some incredible stories from her early days in New York City, where she arrived from her home in Albany with just ‘$90, a pack of baby powder, and a bar of prison soap’ and stayed at the Salvation Army. 

‘My roommate was a prostitute named Edna, and she had the exact same bar of soap as me. But neither of us are admitting that we just got out of prison,’ she said. 

‘There was real money in New York,’ she went on, but she did all her shopping at a discount store, buying up hats for every day of the week. 

She had trouble sleeping, so she would spend nights walking down to Times Square, past the theaters she hoped to dance in one day and do the adult theaters she actually ended up performing in. She would end up in nightclubs like the Peppermint Lounge or The Wagon Wheel. 

Getting started: In her early NYC days, she worked for 'the best thief in the city,' Joe Dorsey, who would loot high-end apartments and give Tanqueray the mink coats to sell

Getting started: In her early NYC days, she worked for ‘the best thief in the city,’ Joe Dorsey, who would loot high-end apartments and give Tanqueray the mink coats to sell

‘The clubs weren’t like they are today. There was no VIP section. No velvet ropes and champagne service. Everyone mingled: the pimps, the hustlers, the entertainers, the tourists. 

‘Back in the sixties, every club in New York was putting in a stage for GoGo dancers, because a GoGo club could make twice as much as a regular club. The girls would dance in cages or behind the bar, and guys would line up to put money in the jukebox. These girls were getting paid.’

She said she wanted to make that kind of money but the dancers there ‘couldn’t be black.’  

Still, she went often enough that the other regulars got to know her and called her ‘Black Stephanie’. 

‘Especially the mob guys. Every single one of them had a black woman on the side, so they’d flirt with me all the time. And I had no problem with it,’ she recalled. ‘It wasn’t long before I was hanging with a whole crew of Italians. And they started giving me little side jobs so I could earn some extra cash.’

This included working for ‘the best thief in the city,’ Joe Dorsey, who would loot high-end apartments and give Tanqueray the mink coats to sell — that is, after she’d had a chance to wear it. 

Stories: The 76-year-old recalled a madam promising her $300 to participate in a racist fantasy with department store heir Bloomingdale in which she role-played as a maid

Stories: The 76-year-old recalled a madam promising her $300 to participate in a racist fantasy with department store heir Bloomingdale in which she role-played as a maid

Role play: She said he bossed her around and called her the N word when she talked back and tried to spank her with a belt. The plan had been to spank her with a tie, so she ran out

Role play: She said he bossed her around and called her the N word when she talked back and tried to spank her with a belt. The plan had been to spank her with a tie, so she ran out

Who was Alfred Bloomingdale? 

Alfred S. Bloomingdale was born in 1916. He was the grandson of Lyman G. Bloomingdale, a co-founder of the Bloomingdales department store. 

Alfred worked in his namesake store as a salesmen for three years before a series of career changes, first as a theatrical agent for Frank Sinatra and Judy Garland, then as a Broadway producer and a Hollywood executive.

Alfred went on to launch Bloomingdales’ ‘Dine and Sign’ credit card, which later merged with Diners Club.

In 1946, he married Betty Lee Newling, with whom he had three children.

The couple were friends with Ronald and Nancy Reagan, and Alfred was appointed to the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board and the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy.  

In 1970, at age 54, Alfred began a 12-year affair with Tanqueray’s friend, Vicki Morgan, who was then just 18. The affair eventually made headlines, and after Bloomingdale’s death in 1982 at age 66, Morgan filed a palimony lawsuit against Bloomingdale’s estate, which was dismissed.

She’d sometimes sell to the upscale call girl Vicki Morgan, who worked for Madame Blanche. One day, Vicki told her that Madame Blanche was looking for a black girl for Alfred Bloomingdale, the heir of the department store fortune.

‘It was a role play thing. All I had to do was go to his hotel room and pretend to be a maid,’ she said. ‘She promised me that I wouldn’t even have to take off my clothes. And the pay was $300 — so I agreed.’

When Tanqueray got there, she said Bloomingdale was on the bed in a Hefner-esque smoking jacket ‘surrounded by five white hookers in French lingerie’ who looked bored and weren’t touching him.

‘He ordered me around for awhile. I was serving them drinks, and picking up clothes off the floor. He gradually got more and more demanding, and I was saying dumb stuff like: “Yessuh, Mr. Bloomingdale. Oh Yes, Mr. Bloomingdale.”‘

She claimed the plan was that she was supposed to start talking back, and that’s when Bloomingdale would ‘call me the N word and whip me with his necktie.’ But when Bloomingdale grabbed a leather belt instead of a necktie, Tanqueray said she bolted, grateful to have taken the money up front. 

DailyMail.com has reached out to Bloomingdale’s for comment.

Vicki also invited her to a party with the Temptations when they came to town to perform at the Copacabana. 

‘All of The Temptations were there, but I got paired off with Dennis — who happened to be the finest of them all. We had the best table in the house. And I could tell that Dennis was into me. We were flirting and laughing.   

‘Everyone was having a great time, when all of the sudden James Brown comes walking up to our table. He must have been drinking. Because he pulled up a chair, and started jabbing his finger at Vicki, screaming about how The Temptations had no business being with a white woman. He kept saying that there were plenty of sisters who look good.’

Famous: She was also invited to a party with the Temptations when they came to town, and turned down a flirtatious Dennis

Famous: She was also invited to a party with the Temptations when they came to town, and turned down a flirtatious Dennis

This made Tanqueray angry, because ‘everyone knew’ James Brown had a white girlfriend. In fact, it was a joke that he’d bought her a mink coat that he took away from her whenever he was angry,

‘So I sat there quietly until James was finished with his ranting and raving, then I said: “Excuse me Mr. Brown, but Geri Miller would like her coat back.”‘

The star stormed out, and The Temptations ‘started laughing so hard that they were rolling on the floor’.

Back at the group’s fancy hotel, Dennis started kissing her before disappearing into the bedroom.

‘He walks back in, and he’s wearing nothing but a leopard silk bathrobe. It was tied so loose that he was just swinging in the breeze. And I mean swinging low. Like you wouldn’t believe.’ 

Tanqueray wasn’t interested in a one night stand, though, so she left. 

‘On the way out I could hear all the other Temps laughing. It was probably the only time that man had ever gotten turned down. And ever since that night, every time the Temptations came to town, I’d go to the show. This went on for decades. 

‘And always on my way out the door, I’d tip the stagehand to pass a note to Dennis: “Do you still have that leopard bathrobe?” I must have passed him thirty different notes over the years. I knew it was driving him crazy.]’ 

'Fly in the buttermilk': Tanqueray ¿ whose real name, readers have now learned, is Stephanie ¿ grew up an hour outside of Albany in a not-too-nice white neighborhood

‘Fly in the buttermilk’: Tanqueray — whose real name, readers have now learned, is Stephanie — grew up an hour outside of Albany in a not-too-nice white neighborhood

Growing up: She went to a private Catholic school, where she read classic novels, went ice skating and horseback riding, and studied Latin

Growing up: She went to a private Catholic school, where she read classic novels, went ice skating and horseback riding, and studied Latin

In the first few posts that were shared on Monday, Tanqueray reflected on the early years of her life, explaining that she grew up an hour outside of Albany in a not-too-nice neighborhood made up of mostly Italians and Jews.

‘I was the fly in a bucket of buttermilk,’ she said.

She went to a private Catholic school, where she read classic novels, went ice skating and horseback riding, and studied Latin. 

‘No black kids were taking Latin in the 1940’s, but I was near the top of my class,’ she said. 

She remembered a crush on a white boy who’d carry her books ‘until one day the nuns gave us a lecture about how you can’t be interracial, so that stopped real quick.’ 

She did ballet, too, and was on pointe at just six years old. 

‘One Christmas they put me inside a big refrigerator box, and wrapped it up in wrapping paper. All the parents gathered around. Then the music started, and the box opened up, and there I was dressed like a doll. Standing on pointe,’ she said. 

‘I began to dance, and the parents went crazy. My mom was so proud that day. Because none of the other kids could do it, even though they were white. 

‘Sometimes on the weekends I’d go over to these kids’ houses, and they had families like you’d see on television. Everyone would be talking nice. Like they were happy to be together. Even the dog would be wagging its tail. But there was nothing like that in my house.’ 

Early skill: She did ballet, too, and was on pointe at just six years old

Early skill: She did ballet, too, and was on pointe at just six years old

Sad: Stephanie described the abuse she faced at the hands of her mother, who'd beat her with a belt if she found a speck of dust on the dining room table

Sad: Stephanie described the abuse she faced at the hands of her mother, who’d beat her with a belt if she found a speck of dust on the dining room table

She described the abuse she faced at the hands of her mother, who’d beat her with a belt if she found a speck of dust on the dining room table.

‘I hated that woman. The only thing I liked about her was her style. She looked just like the movie star Lena Horne. And whenever she walked down the street, both men and women would stop and stare,’ she said, recalling how her mother, who worked as the special assistant to the Governor, used to do all her shopping at the upscale store Flah’s.

‘I’ve always wondered how she rose that high — but I certainly have my guesses. She fit in so well with white society that she wanted nothing to do with anything black. She never acted black. She never talked black. She talked about blacks, but never talked black. She used to tell me that I’d be a lot prettier if she’d married someone with lighter skin,’ she said.

‘And you know what else she tried to tell me once? She was crying about something, and she tried to tell me that she never wanted kids. But she had me anyway so that she could have someone to love. I looked at her like she was crazy. Cause she never showed me love. Not once.’

Stephanie recalled how she used to build a house of a blanket and an old car table, and would play with her dolls underneath. There, she ‘had a little family,’ and would recite this prayer: ‘Lord, please get me out of here so I can find a family that loves me.’ 

Dreams: She'd watch movies with Esther Williams and dream about running away

Dreams: She’d watch movies with Esther Williams and dream about running away

Intimidating figure: Her mother was always well dressed and had an important job

Intimidating figure: Her mother was always well dressed and had an important job

One day, her mother overheard. She burst into the room, kicked over the card table, and slapped Stephanie. The next day, she got rid of all the dolls.

‘All I ever thought about was getting out of that house. I’d spend hours watching those old black-and white Hollywood musicals — with Esther Williams doing ballet in the water. 

‘I’d fantasize about running away from home and dancing right alongside them. That’s the problem with growing up in a white world. You think you can do anything that white people can do.’

Her life took a turn when she met her first boyfriend, a black man named Birdie who ‘was from the hood, but he didn’t act like a hood guy.’ 

‘I just remember that he told me he loved me — which I believed cause I was stupid. I didn’t know what the f**k love was,’ she said.

She soon found herself pregnant, and Birdie made a plan to move together to New York City. He left first to find an apartment, and Stephanie soon followed — but when she got there, he sent her back up to Albany. 

‘Turns out he was already married, and his wife was some sort of invalid, so he decided that he couldn’t leave her. I was s*** out of luck,’ she said. 

Taking a turn: She met her first boyfriend and got pregnant, but soon found out he was married

Taking a turn: She met her first boyfriend and got pregnant, but soon found out he was married

Tough beginnings: She suck back into her mom's house to get some of her clothes, and her mom had her arrested. She was thrown in jail as a teenager

Tough beginnings: She suck back into her mom’s house to get some of her clothes, and her mom had her arrested. She was thrown in jail as a teenager

Stephanie, then 18, refused to move back home with her mom, but she did sneak into the house in the middle of the night to get the rest of her clothes. Unfortunately, her mom heard her and called the police.

In court, the judge gave her a choice: give her baby up for adoption and move back in with her mother, or go to jail. Stephanie agreed to the adoption, but chose prison over her mother’s house.

‘Since nobody from the outside was putting money into my account, I had to get a job in the prison factory. Back in the day all the bras and underpants were made by convicts — so that’s what we were doing,’ she said.

‘I’d always been good at art, so on the side I started making marriage certificates for all the lesbians. I’d use crayons to draw little hearts and stuff. Then I’d sign it at the bottom to make it look official. In return they’d give me cigarettes — which was money. 

‘Pretty soon I had a little reputation. I was like the artist of the prison. The warden even asked me to choreograph a dance for the prisoners on family day.’ 

Moving on: She almost didn't get parole because of her mother, but the warden helped her get out

Moving on: She almost didn’t get parole because of her mother, but the warden helped her get out

She was sure that her good behavior would mean she’d be out on parole after nine months, but the warden called her into her office with some bad news: Stephanie’s mother was sleeping with the head of the parole board, and didn’t want Stephanie to get out.

Luckily, the warden had her back, and managed to get her parole hearing rescheduled for a month later, when a different panel would be deciding parole. 

‘My test scores were off the chart. I was like the valedictorian of the prison. And the warden even wrote me a letter of recommendation, so my parole was approved,’ she said.

Before she left, she checked in on a fellow inmate named Roberta who was known for reading palms. She recalled how Roberta told her that her future was in New York City, that she’d only be in love once, and that she’d have a tough and lonely life — but once day, ‘a lot of people would know my name.’

Fast forward a few years, and Stephanie was in NYC, where, she said, ‘ten thousand men’ knew the name Tanqueray. 

My signature meant something to them. They’d line up around the block whenever I was dancing in Times Square, just so I could sign the cover of their nudie magazine,’ she recalled. 

Next step: She moved to New York City, where eventually she started stripping

Next step: She moved to New York City, where eventually she started stripping

‘I’d always write: “You were the best I ever had.” Or some stupid s*** like that. Something to make them smile for a second. Something to make them feel like they’d gotten to know me.’

For $20, they could then watch her dance on stage for 18 minutes. 

‘That’s how long you’ve got to hold ‘em. For 18 minutes you’ve got to make them forget that they’re getting older. And that they aren’t where they want to be in life. And that it’s probably too late to do much about it,’ she said.

She liked to dance to the blues, because it’s ‘funky’ music and she can ‘really zero in on a guy.’ 

‘You look him right in the eyes. Smile at him. Wink. Put a finger in your mouth and lick it a little bit. Make sure you wear plenty of lip gloss so your lips are very, very shiny. If you’re doing it right, you can make him think: ‘Wow, she’s dancing just for me.”You can make him think he’s doing something to your insides. You can make him fall in love. 

‘Then when the music stops, you step off the stage, and beat it back to the dressing room.’ 

Lots to tell! Tanqueray at the top of her game in the 1970s and has lots of amazing stories

Lots to tell! Tanqueray at the top of her game in the 1970s and has lots of amazing stories

Tanqueray has shared even more stories from her younger days when she was profiled last year. 

She revealed that after first moving to the big city, she attended the Fashion Institute of Technology. She ‘hated’ it there, and was already working on the side, making costumes for strippers and porn stars in Times Square.

‘All my friends were gay people, because they never judged me. All I did was gay bars: drag queen contests, Crisco Disco; I loved the whole scene,’ she said. ‘And I couldn’t get enough of the costumes.’ 

She recalled a friend who use to sit at a bar and sell clothes stolen from the high-end department stores Bergdorf Goodman and Lord & Taylor, and thanks to those hot goods, she had quite a wardrobe herself. She recalled wearing mink coats, five-inch heels, and stockings with seams up the back. 

‘I looked like a drag queen, honey,’ she said. 

‘One night a Hasidic rabbi tried to pick me up because he thought I was a tranny. I had to tell him: “Baby, this is real fish!”‘ 

More, please! She first posed for Humans of New York last year and earned lots of attention

More, please! She first posed for Humans of New York last year and earned lots of attention

She shared story after outrageous story of mob-controlled clubs, eyebrow-raising stage acts, and even a former president of the United States who slept with one of her friends

She shared story after outrageous story of mob-controlled clubs, eyebrow-raising stage acts, and even a former president of the United States who slept with one of her friends

Tanqueray said she was ‘the only black girl making white girl money’ in the ’70s. 

‘I danced in so many mob clubs that I learned Italian,’ she went on. ‘Black girls weren’t even allowed in some of these places. Nothing but guidos with their pinky rings and the one long fingernail they used for cocaine. 

‘I even did a full twenty minutes in the place they filmed Saturday Night Fever.’

She said she made her ‘real money’ traveling, making up to three thousand dollars on trips to places liked Fort Dix, where they’d call her ‘Ms. Black Universe.’

‘I had this magic trick where I’d put baby bottle tops on my nipples and squirt real milk, then I’d pull a cherry out of my G-string and feed it to the guy in the front row.’

Things were wild, but she never ‘used dildos on stage’ or had sex with booking agents or clients.

‘In fact, one night after a show, I caught another dancer sneaking off to the Tate Hotel with our biggest tipper. Not allowed. So the next night we put a little itching powder in her G-string. 








Before it was cleaned up: Times Square used to be quite seedy and was packed with strip clubs and porn shops

Before it was cleaned up: Times Square used to be quite seedy and was packed with strip clubs and porn shops

On the scene: Tanqueray says she performed in the same nightclub where Saturday Night Fever was shot ¿ a place that was known as 2001 Odyssey (pictured)

On the scene: Tanqueray says she performed in the same nightclub where Saturday Night Fever was shot — a place that was known as 2001 Odyssey (pictured) 

‘Boy, did she put on a show that night. Didn’t see her again until “The Longest Yard” with Burt Reynolds. So I guess she finally f***ed the right one.’

She also reflected on how the strip club scene was different then that it is now, noting that the adult clubs were all ‘mob-controlled’ — specifically by ‘Matty The Horse,’ the nickname for mob boss Matthew Ianniello of the Genovese crime family.

Ianniello did control the sex industry around Times Square in the ’60s and ’70s, but was in 1986 was convicted of bid rigging racketeering charges.

‘Honestly the mob guys never bothered me,’ Tanqueray said. ‘They were cool, and I liked how they dressed. They wore custom made suits. And they went to hair stylists, not barbers. 

This guy: She said the strip club scene was 'mob-controlled' ¿ specifically by 'Matty The Horse,' the nickname for mob boss Matthew Ianniello of the Genovese crime family

This guy: She said the strip club scene was ‘mob-controlled’ — specifically by ‘Matty The Horse,’ the nickname for mob boss Matthew Ianniello of the Genovese crime family

‘These guys wouldn’t even let you touch their hair when you were f***ing them. Not that I ever f***ed them. Because I never turned tricks. 

‘Well, except for one time,’ she added.

She took a job from a woman named Madame Blanche who controlled all the ‘high dollar prostitutes’ at the time. 

‘She was like the Internet — could get you anything you wanted. And all the powerful men came to her because she never talked,’ she recalled.

‘She set me up with a department store magnate who wanted a black girl dressed like a maid. I thought I could do it. But when I got to his hotel room, he wanted to spank me with a real belt. So that was it for me. I was done. 

‘But Madame Blanche set my best friend Vicki up with the President every time he came to New York. And don’t you dare write his name cause I can’t afford the lawyers,’ she added. 

Though she didn’t explicitly say this occurred in the ’70s, she referenced that decade several times in her stories. Presidents who served in the ’70s include Richard Nixon (1969-1974), Gerald Ford (1974-1977), and Jimmy Carter (1977-1981).

‘He’d always spend an hour with her,’ she went on. ‘He’d send a car to pick her up, bring her to his hotel room, put a Secret Service agent in front of the door, and get this: all he ever did was eat her p***y!’

When Humans of New York shared the original posts, readers were left hungry for more. Celebrities like Hilary Swank, Busy Philipps, Phoebe Robinson, Matt Bomer, and Ireland Baldwin liked the posts, while Jennifer Garner demanded, ‘Why is this not a @netflix series?’



Source link

Sweden's lockdown-free coronavirus response is at risk as officials mull 'chain-breaking' measures

The Sympathetic Adulterer (The Office)