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Vladimir Putin calls for set of 'moral rules' to guide interaction between humans and AI

Vladimir Putin has called for ‘moral rules’ on the development of artificial intelligence – urging companies ‘technology must not be invented for the sake of technology’.

Speaking at an event on AI technology in Moscow, Russia, on Saturday, the Russian president called for safeguards, setting out rules for how humans should interact with the robots.   

President Putin said: ‘Discussion is currently underway on social aspects and implications of the use of artificial intelligence. It is a very important issue.

‘I suggest that the professional community and companies should contemplate drawing up a set of moral rules for interaction between humans and artificial intelligence.

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during a panel discussion as part of the Artificial Intelligence Journey forum, in Moscow on November 9, 2019

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during a panel discussion as part of the Artificial Intelligence Journey forum, in Moscow on November 9, 2019

Adding: ‘Human beings are the highest value. Technology must not be invented for the sake of technology.

‘Our main goal is sustainable and harmonious development, a higher life quality and new opportunities for citizens.’

He praised the use of AI technology in allowing public administration to run smoothly and the new transparency by giving an insight into ‘what the authorities are doing and what they are motivated by when taking certain decisions’.

Putin said he hoped the technology would help overcome ‘the inertia and sluggishness of the bureaucratic machine’. 

The event was a two day 'Artificial Intelligence Journey' where 5,000 people gathered, including 1,000 companies, to discuss the future of AI

The event was a two day ‘Artificial Intelligence Journey’ where 5,000 people gathered, including 1,000 companies, to discuss the future of AI

Russia claims it will invest billions in Artificial intelligence and will remove red tape inhibiting pioneers of the technology. 

Access to data is needed for AI to be more efficient, claimed Putin. 

In order to allow an easy route for AI to serve mankind, Putin stated that ‘unnecessary hurdles’ would be removed for developers, but people’s rights and data privacy would be protected. 

The event was a two day ‘Artificial Intelligence Journey’ where 5,000 people gathered, including 1,000 companies, to discuss the future of AI.  

Gazprom Neft Management Board Chairman, Alexander Dyukov, MTS President Alexei Kornya, Sberbank CEO and Chairman of the Executive Board, German Gref, Russia's Deputy Prime Minister Maxim Akimov, Yandex IT company CEO Arkady Volozh, Russian Direct Investment Fund CEO Kirill Dmitriev, and Mail.Ru Group CEO Boris Dobrodeyev (left to right)

Gazprom Neft Management Board Chairman, Alexander Dyukov, MTS President Alexei Kornya, Sberbank CEO and Chairman of the Executive Board, German Gref, Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister Maxim Akimov, Yandex IT company CEO Arkady Volozh, Russian Direct Investment Fund CEO Kirill Dmitriev, and Mail.Ru Group CEO Boris Dobrodeyev (left to right)

Putin said he hoped the technology would help overcome 'the inertia and sluggishness of the bureaucratic machine'

Putin said he hoped the technology would help overcome ‘the inertia and sluggishness of the bureaucratic machine’

WHY ARE PEOPLE SO WORRIED ABOUT AI?

It is an issue troubling some of the greatest minds in the world at the moment, from Bill Gates to Elon Musk.

SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk described AI as our ‘biggest existential threat’ and likened its development as ‘summoning the demon’.

He believes super intelligent machines could use humans as pets.

Professor Stephen Hawking said it is a ‘near certainty’ that a major technological disaster will threaten humanity in the next 1,000 to 10,000 years.

They could steal jobs 

More than 60 percent of people fear that robots will lead to there being fewer jobs in the next ten years, according to a 2016 YouGov survey.

And 27 percent predict that it will decrease the number of jobs ‘a lot’ with previous research suggesting admin and service sector workers will be the hardest hit.

As well as posing a threat to our jobs, other experts believe AI could ‘go rogue’ and become too complex for scientists to understand.

A quarter of the respondents predicted robots will become part of everyday life in just 11 to 20 years, with 18 percent predicting this will happen within the next decade. 

They could ‘go rogue’ 

Computer scientist Professor Michael Wooldridge said AI machines could become so intricate that engineers don’t fully understand how they work.

If experts don’t understand how AI algorithms function, they won’t be able to predict when they fail.

This means driverless cars or intelligent robots could make unpredictable ‘out of character’ decisions during critical moments, which could put people in danger.

For instance, the AI behind a driverless car could choose to swerve into pedestrians or crash into barriers instead of deciding to drive sensibly.

They could wipe out humanity 

Some people believe AI will wipe out humans completely.

‘Eventually, I think human extinction will probably occur, and technology will likely play a part in this,’ DeepMind’s Shane Legg said in a recent interview.

He singled out artificial intelligence, or AI, as the ‘number one risk for this century’.

Musk warned that AI poses more of a threat to humanity than North Korea.

‘If you’re not concerned about AI safety, you should be. Vastly more risk than North Korea,’ the 46-year-old wrote on Twitter.

‘Nobody likes being regulated, but everything (cars, planes, food, drugs, etc) that’s a danger to the public is regulated. AI should be too.’

Musk has consistently advocated for governments and private institutions to apply regulations on AI technology.

He has argued that controls are necessary in order protect machines from advancing out of human control








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Written by Angle News

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