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Who was Terry Fox? Google Doodle celebrates Canadian athlete and humanitarian

TODAY’S Google Doodle celebrates Canadian athlete and humanitarian Terry Fox.

But who was Terry Fox, and why is he being celebrated with a Google Doodle?

Today's Google Doodle was illustrated by Toronto-based artist Lynn Scurfiled.  

Today’s Google Doodle was illustrated by Toronto-based artist Lynn Scurfiled.  

Who was Terry Fox?

Terrance Stanley Fox was a Canadian humanitarian and athlete, who lost his leg to cancer.

Born on July 28, 1958, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Terry Fox was a natural competitor known for his commitment and fierce work ethic.

In 1977, at the age of 18, Fox was diagnosed with bone cancer, resulting in the amputation of his right leg. 

During his treatment for cancer, Fox was deeply touched by the stories of the cancer sufferers he met on the ward, and it inspired him to run east to west across Canada in order to raise funds for finding a cure for the disease.

Why is he being celebrated with a Google Doodle?

The Terry Fox Run has raised over $800 million for cancer research

Three years after his diagnosis, on April 12, 1980, Fox embarked on his “Marathon of Hope” in St John’s, Newfoundland.

He ran close to a marathon a day for four months, all in all, completing 5,373 kilometers (approximately 3,339 miles).

Despite failing to complete the entire run due to the return of his cancer, which eventually cost him his life, Fox raised an incredible dollar for every Canadian citizen, totalling over $24 million for cancer research.

The first Terry Fox Run was held on September 13 1981, raised $3.5 million for cancer research, and it has become an annual event.

To date, the Terry Fox Run has raised over $800 million for cancer research.

What is a Google Doodle?

In 1998, Google founders Larry and Sergey drew a stick figure behind the second ‘o’ of Google to show they were out of office at the Burning Man festival and with that, Google Doodles were born.

The company decided that they should decorate the logo to mark cultural moments and it soon became clear that users really enjoyed the change to the Google homepage.

Now, there is a full team of doodlers, illustrators, graphic designers, animators and classically trained artists who help create what you see on those days.

In 2020 so far they’ve had Doodles celebrating Scottish astrophysicist genius Mary Somerville and Aids activist Nkosi Johnson, who died aged 12.



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