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Woman shocks policeman with highest drink-drive result he's seen in Australia in a decade

A woman has shocked a Queensland police boss by allegedly recording the highest blood-alcohol level he has seen in a decade – more than six times the legal limit.

The 29-year-old woman was driving along Old Bay Road, Deception Bay at 1.45pm on Wednesday, June 24, when she attracted the attention of police with her ‘manner of driving’.

Police stopped the woman from Burpengary East north of Brisbane and noticed she appeared intoxicated, police said.

Police were shocked to find a Queensland woman allegedly blew 0.30 percent on a Wednesday afternoon in Deception Bay, north of Brisbane. Pictured: stock image of an RBT

Police were shocked to find a Queensland woman allegedly blew 0.30 percent on a Wednesday afternoon in Deception Bay, north of Brisbane. Pictured: stock image of an RBT

The woman took a breathalyser test and blew a blood-alcohol result of more than 0.30 percent, police said. 

That is six times the open license limit of less than 0.05 percent.

The woman was taken to Deception Bay police station where she allegedly recorded a second blood-alcohol reading, this time from a specimen sample, of 0.298 percent, police said.

Deception Bay Road Policing Unit acting officer-in-charge Ken Sands said it was the highest reading he had seen in the last decade.

‘The highest one I’ve seen in my service is mid point-threes, but certainly in the last decade this is the highest reading I’ve seen,’ he told the Courier Mail. 

‘It’s pretty scary.’ 

The alleged reading of 0.30 percent is six times the legal limit and almost enough to put a person into a coma with alcohol poisoning

The alleged reading of 0.30 percent is six times the legal limit and almost enough to put a person into a coma with alcohol poisoning

The woman was charged with high-range drink driving and is expected to appear in Caboolture Magistrates Court on July 23. 

According to the Australian Government’s Department of Health, blood alcohol readings of greater than 0.30 percent can lead to alcohol poisoning, coma and death.

Although the Burpengary East woman’s blood-alcohol concentration was shockingly high, it is not the highest ever seen across Australia.

Blood-alcohol concentrations 

What alcohol does to your body

Up to 0.05 percent

feeling of wellbeing, talkative

0.05 to 0.08 percent

impaired judgement and movement

reduced inhibitions

0.08 to 0.15 percent

slurred speech

impaired balance, coordination, vision and reflexes

unstable emotions, nausea, vomiting

 0.15 to 0.30 percent

unable to walk without help

sleepy, difficulty breathing

memory loss 

loss of bladder control

possible loss of consciousness

over 0.30 percent

coma, death

 Source: Australian Health Department

In January, 2016, a 52-year-old woman recorded a reading of 0.486 percent after a crash near Coffs Harbour, NSW.

In late 2015, a 42-year-old Queensland woman blew 0.48 percent after being found passed out in her car in front of a Runaway Bay cafe. 

Shocked police and alcohol experts said at the time that they thought it to be the highest blood-alcohol reading ever recorded in Australia.  

Queensland’s Moreton Bay district, which includes Deception Bay, recorded 19 drink-drivers over the past week, police said. 

One of those charged was a 28-year-old Caboolture man who allegedly recorded a blood-alcohol concentration of 0.102 percent.

He has been charged and is expected to appear in Caboolture Magistrates Court on July 22.    

According to the Queensland Government, 55 people are killed each year on the state’s roads due to drink-driving and a further 550 are seriously injured.

Having no alcohol is safer than having just a small amount, as it is easy to exceed the 0.05 percent minimum, according to the Queensland Government’s StreetSmarts website.

Blood alcohol concentrations can continue to rise after you stop drinking, and it can be difficult to monitor levels due to different alcohol contents and the size and shape of glasses.

Other variables can also affect your blood-alcohol concentration making it difficult to guess, including your weight, gender, metabolism, how often you drink and how long it has been since you have eaten, the website says. 

Coffee, sleep, vomiting or exercise will not reduce your blood-alcohol levels. 

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